Tyler Too

Whither the Weather?

By Gus Tyler

  • Print
  • Share Share

It was Mark Twain who, many moons ago, said, “Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it.”

The almost universal assumption was that the quality of the weather was determined by forces beyond human control. That seemingly self-evident view is no longer held either by scientists or by the public according to a New York Times/CBS News Poll. Their consensus is that global warming is a verifiable fact and that something must be done about it within the next 20 to 30 years or life on earth for humans will become impossible.

The threat is embodied in a phenomenon called global warming. As the earth warms up, the glaciers in the Arctic Circle and the Antarctic begin to melt. As a consequence, the ocean levels rise. All areas in the world that abut oceans and their tributaries, like the Mediterranean, are endangered.

The rise in the world’s waterways is, however, just one out of several environmental dangers. The melting glaciers in the Antarctic have, ironically, brought freezing weather to people living east of the Mississippi. Snowfalls that used to be measured in inches are, now, being measured in feet. Here’s why and how:

The melting of icebergs in the Antarctic has lowered the temperature of the Gulf Stream that, in the past, served to moderate the winter weather along our eastern states. Ironically, the inhabitants of states on the Atlantic coast were exposed to wicked winters this year because of global warming.

There are some learned folk who maintain that what is happening is not due to human pollution. They note that way back in time, when Homo sapiens were not around to pollute, there were successive waves of freezing known as “ice ages” attributable to spots on the sun. This may be true. But it is irrelevant. It may be that nature by itself is likely to move from cool to warm and vice versa. But that does not negate the negative impact of man’s polluting ways.

One of the more encouraging developments on the way to pollution control is a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that held that the U.S. government had the right to ban the use of greenhouse gases.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Economics

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • The real heroines of Passover prep aren't even Jewish. But the holiday couldn't happen without them.
  • Is Handel’s ‘Messiah’ an anti-Semitic screed?
  • Meet the Master of the Matzo Ball.
  • Pierre Dulaine wants to do in his hometown of Jaffa what he did for kids in Manhattan: teach them to dance.
  • "The first time I met Mick Jagger, I said, 'Those are the tackiest shoes I’ve ever seen.'” Jewish music journalist Lisa Robinson remembers the glory days of rock in her new book, "There Goes Gravity."
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.