The Shmooze

Eliad Cohen Makes OUT Magazine's Top 10

By Yanir Dekel

Israeli model and entrepreneur/party wizard Eliad Cohen has made it, once again, to OUT magazine’s “Top 10 Eligible Bachelors” list.

2013 was Cohen’s most successful year as a party promoter. Through his startup business, Gayville — a (sort-of) gay interpretation of Airbnb.com — his “Papa” parties, which started in Tel Aviv, have taken off and Cohen has been travelling to New York, Paris and Sydney to make thousands of party people happy. In the next few weeks Eliad will also be traveling with his party to London, Rio and Singapore.

“The international success of the Papa Parties has a lot to do with the high-energy vibe that translates from music to show to theme to crowd interaction,” Cohen explained to the Australian magazine Star Observer this week. ” There is very much an interactive quality to the parties .No party is good without great music, so that’s always our number one concern.”

This isn’t the first time that Eliad Cohen has made OUT’s list: last year, the magazine’s readers ranked Cohen at #2, right after ‘Glee’ star Chris Colfer. The 2014 list was voted on by the magazine readers out of 100 potential gay bachelors.

Cohen is also far from the only Jewish guy to have made the list. American Idol alumnus Adam Lambert topped this year’s list, grabbing almost 22% of the votes. Actor Wentworth Miller (who came out as gay last year) was ranked at #9.

Other Jewish nominees who didn’t make the cut: Daniel Mendsohn, Billie Eichner, Ken Mehlman, Andy Cohen and Nate Silver.

Photo credit: Facebook/Eliad Cohen.

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Hooking Up, Israeli Style

By Michael Kaminer

Be sincere. Stay fit. And don’t be afraid to nudge.

That’s the advice from Tel Aviv-born party promoter Eliad Cohen on “How to Hook Up With a Sexy Israeli” in this week’s issue of Next, a New York gay weekly.

Cohen’s “Tel-Aviv and Madrid-inspired” party, Papa, makes its stateside debut this Sunday. To mark the occasion, Next “asked the Chelsea-via-Tel Aviv resident just what it takes to get the attentions of the boys of Zion.”

How, the magazine asked, “can we possibly manage to land a kosher man for ourselves?” Step 1, says Cohen: Be sincere, be yourself. “We Israelis are famous for being direct, so it’s important for someone we’re with to be sincere, honest and just basically himself.” Second: Fitness is important. “We enter the army for three years when we’re 18. I think that the constant training instills an appreciation for physical fitness from an early age,” he tells Next. Number three: Get ready to go, go, go! “Tel Aviv is a very active city, so we’re always on the go.”

And finally, Don’t be afraid to be a little persistent. “Israelis have a nickname: Sabras. A sabra is a type of cactus that’s prickly on the outside but really sweet on the inside. We can be a little tough and argumentative on the outside, but inside, we’re attentive and sweet. Don’t always judge a book by its cover — something like that.”

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