The Shmooze

Jim Carrey Angers Jews, Hindus With 'SNL' Skit

By Michael Kaminer

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Ever tried a move called the Ganesh in bed? Jim Carrey did, and he’s feeling the wrath of Hindu and Jewish groups as a result. In a skit that aired on “Saturday Night Live” this month, Carrey played an “erotic shaman” who had developed new sex positions with an elderly character played by “SNL” regular Kenan Thompson.

“Lord Ganesh is highly revered in Hinduism and is meant to be worshiped in temples or home shrines, not to be thrown around loosely in reimagined versions for dramatic effects in TV series,” was the response from a Hindu statesman named Rajan Zed, the Toronto Sun reported. “Such an absurd depiction of Lord Ganesh, with no scriptural backing, is hurtful to devotees. It’s also disturbing and offensive to the one billion Hindus around the world.”

Rajan Zed, identified as the President of the Universal Society of Hinduism by the Times of India, “also asked Golden Globe winner actor-comedian Jim Carrey, actor-comedian Kenan Thomson, NBC Universal President and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Zucker, and ‘SNL’ Executive Producer Lorne Michaels to tender a public apology for it and urged them not to inappropriately drag Hindu deities to advance the commercial or other agenda in the future,” The Times reported.

The Hindus aren’t the only group upset by the comedy routine, the Sun said. “Leading Jewish advocate Rabbi Elizabeth W. Beyer has released a statement criticizing the parties responsible for the skit,” according to the Sun. “Making fun of someone’s religion or god is not within keeping with our ideals as members of a civilized community… We Jews fully support Rajan Zed’s protest initiative on this issue and urge others involved in television and film industries to be more considerate to the feelings of devotees of all religions in the future.”


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Lorne Michaels, Kenan Thomson, Jim Carrey, Jeff Zucker, Hinduism, Ganesh, Rajan Zed



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