The Jew And The Carrot

Shechting: The New Jewish Food Fad

By Nadia Schreiber

Courtesy of Hazon
Salting turkeys at the 2008 Food Conference

We’ve gotten our hands dirty making pickles. We’ve pounded sauerkraut like bubbes from the Lower East Side. We’ve planted herbs in havdallah gardens and we’ve learned amazing new braids for our challah, which we’ve leavened with natural sourdough. The DIY food movement has taken hold of the Jewish community — and it’s logical that after the vegetable growing and the bread baking that our thoughts turn to meat.

Ironically, though the DIY movement may be fueling interest in kosher slaughter, though, it’s not something you can read about on an urban homesteader blog and try in your backyard. The laws of shechita (kosher slaughter) are carefully guarded, and one must undergo rigorous training to become a shochet (a ritual slaughterer), at least according to orthodox standards. That said, there is still an opportunity for hands-on learning, and communities across the country have been gathering at farms and community centers to watch kosher shechita and in some cases, pluck a feather or two. The experiences are profound, and participants often have the opportunity to wrestle with important issues of meat eating, kashrut and Jewish tradition as a whole.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Sacred Table, Schechitah, Hazon, Food Conference, Congregation HEA, Beantown Jewish Gardens

The Kitchen Bookshelf: Tasty Books for Your Yiddishe Mama

By Devra Ferst

iStock

Mother’s Day may be a holiday that was made up by Hallmark, but it’s also one well worth celebrating.

There’s perhaps no stronger stereotype of a Jewish mother than one who feeds her kindele well: She makes matzo ball soup and roasted chicken for dinner — and sends her children home with Tupperware containers filled with leftovers. So this Mother’s Day, we recommend treating her to a meal of dishes that come from a less familiar Jewish community whether its from Iraq, Persia, or one of London’s hottest restaurants. Mom might just be so in love with the “new” Jewish dishes that she’ll want to borrow the cookbook, which would conveniently make a perfect mother’s day present. Here are our recommendations of this spring’s crop of Jewish food books, just in time for the day that honors the Yiddishe mama.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Plenty, The Sacred Table, My Father's Daughter, Mother's Day, Jewish Food, Hadassah Everyday Cookbook, Flavors of Babylon

'The Sacred Table': Moving Beyond Our Food Comfort Zones

By Rabbi Mary L. Zamore

Since I started working on “The Sacred Table: Creating a Jewish Food Ethic” over a year ago, I have noticed something interesting about people’s reaction to this anthology which explores the Reform Jewish approach to food and food production. Upon viewing the wide range of topics discussed in the book (essays subjects range from ritual laws to environmental challenges to worker’s rights, to name a few) many people read “The Sacred Table” as an affirmation of the values they already uphold. I find this fascinating, as I intended this volume to challenge the Jewish world to stretch their approach to food and to increase their passion for ritual and ethical kashrut.

In some ways, the book becomes a Rorschach test for how individuals define their personal kashrut (think: Jewish way of eating). So, as I meet readers, people will proudly exclaim remarks like: “About time the Reform Movement teaches our people to keep kosher!” or “I love your eco-book!” After a lecture, one reader even proudly told me that she planned to read only the chapters that apply to her. Yikes! The purpose of the anthology is to explore the challenges of navigating personal and communal food choices — all Jewish aspects of eating and food production. It is not a book about one value.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Passover, Food Values, Hametz, The Sacred Table




Find us on Facebook!
  • From Gene Simmons to Pink — Meet the Jews who rock:
  • The images, which have since been deleted, were captioned: “Israel is the last frontier of the free world."
  • As J Street backs Israel's operation in Gaza, does it risk losing grassroots support?
  • What Thomas Aquinas might say about #Hamas' tunnels:
  • The Jewish bachelorette has spoken.
  • "When it comes to Brenda Turtle, I ask you: What do you expect of a woman repressed all her life who suddenly finds herself free to explore? We can sit and pass judgment, especially when many of us just simply “got over” own sexual repression. But we are obliged to at least acknowledge that this problem is very, very real, and that complete gender segregation breeds sexual repression and unhealthy attitudes toward female sexuality."
  • "Everybody is proud of the resistance. No matter how many people, including myself, disapprove of or even hate Hamas and its ideology, every single person in Gaza is proud of the resistance." Part 2 of Walid Abuzaid's on-the-ground account of life in #Gaza:
  • After years in storage, Toronto’s iconic red-and-white "Sam the Record Man" sign, complete with spinning discs, will return to public view near its original downtown perch. The sign came to symbolize one of Canada’s most storied and successful Jewish family businesses.
  • Is $4,000 too much to ask for a non-member to be buried in a synagogue cemetery?
  • "Let’s not fall into the simplistic us/them dichotomy of 'we were just minding our business when they started firing rockets at us.' We were not just minding our business. We were building settlements, manning checkpoints, and filling jails." What do you think?
  • PHOTOS: 10,000 Israel supporters gathered for a solidarity rally near the United Nations in New York yesterday.
  • Step into the Iron Dome with Tuvia Tenenbom.
  • What do you think of Wonder Woman's new look?
  • "She said that Ruven Barkan, a Conservative rabbi, came into her classroom, closed the door and turned out the lights. He asked the class of fourth graders to lie on the floor and relax their bodies. Then, he asked them to pray for abused children." Read Paul Berger's compelling story about a #Savannah community in turmoil:
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.