The Jew And The Carrot

Sephardic Poached Fish in Pepper Sauce

By Paula Shoyer

Photograph by Michael Bennett Kress

This recipe is versatile and can be made with any type of white fish or salmon. You can really kick up the spice factor by adding a tablespoon of store-bought harissa or some more chili powder, hot paprika or red pepper flakes. This dish also can be served as a main course for lunch over the holiday.

Serves 6–8

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Advanced prep: May be made 3 days in advance
Equipment: Cutting board • Knives • Measuring cups and spoons • Large frying pan with 2-inch sides • Silicone spatula

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 medium onions, cut in half and thinly sliced
1 red pepper, cored, seeded and thinly sliced
1 orange pepper, cored, seeded and thinly sliced
1 yellow pepper, cored, seeded and thinly sliced
¼ teaspoon paprika
¾ teaspoon kosher salt
Black pepper
¼–½ teaspoon chili powder, hot paprika or crushed red pepper flakes
1½ cups water
2 pounds white fish (such as tilapia, halibut or flounder) or salmon
2/3 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves, chopped

1) Cut fish into 2-by-5-inch long pieces, or fillets may be cut lengthwise in half. Set aside. Heat the oil in a large frying pan with 2-inch sides over medium-low heat. Add the garlic and onions, and cook for 5 minutes. Add the red, orange and yellow peppers, and cook for another 4 minutes. Stir in the paprika, salt and black pepper to taste. Stir in the chili powder. Add the water, increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil.

2) Reduce the heat to low, place the fish slices on top of the garlic, onions and peppers, cover and cook for 5 minutes. Use a fork to pick up some of the peppers and onions and place them on top of the fish slices. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes. Taste the sauce and add more salt if necessary. Sprinkle with the cilantro and serve. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Reprinted with permission from New Passover Menu ©2015 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.

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A Healthy Meal Between Holidays

By Liza Schoenfein

Roasted wild salmon over lentils. Photograph by Liza Schoenfein.

I’m always aware that the period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s is a high-calorie danger zone, so I tend to be fairly mindful. I just realized that I’m usually less conscious — and therefore less careful — between Purim and Passover. But here we are, sandwiched between the bookends of boozy parties and heavy holiday dinners. This year, I intend to lighten it up so that I don’t head into the warmer months feeling like I need to wear a muumuu.

This recipe takes little more than half an hour start to finish. It can easily be doubled (or reduced) depending on the number of people you’re serving. For a fancier dinner I like to roast individual pieces of salmon so everyone gets a neat presentation. For a more casual meal, I serve family style, mounding the lentils on a platter and placing one big fillet on top.

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Recipes From 'Across the Sea' in Tel Aviv

By Renee Ghert-Zand

Clay McLachlan

A new stunning Israeli book aims to bridge the space between the ocean and the table. Half cookbook, half artful seafood encyclopedia, the book is a project of famed Tel Aviv port restaurant Mul-Yam (or, Across the Sea).

“Mul-Yam is known for bringing unusual fish to Israel,” the book’s designer Dan Alexander said about the 17-year-old restaurant. “We wanted to show [the owner] Shalom Maharovsky’s obsession in bringing the best raw material. He was the first to bring lobsters, oysters and rare seafood to Israel.” In 2003, Mul-Yam was the first Mediterranean-region restaurant to be added to the elite Les Grandes Tables du Monde group.

The first section of the book, which is also called “Mul-Yam,” contains stunningly artful photographs of a wide selection of domestic and imported fish and edible sea creatures — with their names given in seven languages. Culinary information along with scientific and even mythological anecdotes accompany the photographs. The book’s second part consists of recipes from the restaurant, along with beautiful photographs of the prepared dishes.

“The challenge was to create something people wanted to look at,” Alexander explained. “Creating a catalogue of fish was risky. It could have ended up just a book of dead fish.”

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Fins and Scales Are Not All That Make Seafood Kosher

By Amanda Schanfield

© Monterey Bay Aquarium

This summer, while interning at Hazon, I have been working on a supplement to the Hazon Food Guide on kosher, sustainable fish. Prior to this project, my experience with fish had largely been enjoying the delicious lox and bagels at Kiddush without considering where that fish came from. Sure, I knew to look for cans of tuna that said “dolphin friendly” but I certainly did not invest nearly as much time thinking about the origin of my fish as I did thinking about whether my kosher chicken or beef was organic and locally raised. After all, our sages deemed fish parve, right?

Oh how my view of creatures with fins and scales has forever changed with the help of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch, the Environmental Defense Fund, and the World Wildlife Fund. Fish are the last group of wild animals that are hunted for mass consumption. As the worldwide demand for fish has increased, overfishing has made it impossible for wild fish populations to keep up with the demand.

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