The Jew And The Carrot

Mixing Bowl: Brisket Lab; Hanukkah Recipes

By Devra Ferst

Courtesy of Daniel Delaney

There’s a new cookbook about shmaltz! (More details to come soon on JCarrot.) In the meantime check out this first look. [Eater]

Brisketlab. We really live in a wonderful world, when places like this exist. [Serious Eats]

Eight desserts for eight nights of Hanukkah. Personally, we love the marshmallow dreidels. [Serious Eats

Some seriously wacky bagel flavors are coming out of The Bagel Store in Williamsburg. Sweet potato bagel? French toast bagel? What kind of schmear goes with that anyway? [Serious Eats]

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Mixing Bowl: Jewish Soups, Organic Farming and Schwartz's Deli

By Devra Ferst

iStock

This winter hasn’t been the coldest, but we’re still craving bowls of steaming delicious soups. Leah Koenig rounds up her nine favorite Jewish soups from around the globe. Spoons up! [Forward]

Chocolate Babka Bread Pudding. Need we say more? [Serious Eats]

A new fellowship in organic plant breeding is getting off the ground, thanks to the Clif Bar Family Foundation. [LA Times]

These might just be the most interesting rugelach we’ve ever heard of. Try out a recipe for pumpkin, sage and walnut rugelach. [Food 52]

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Mixing Bowl: Bittman on the 'Unhealthy Tax'; Pickles and MObama's Solution to Food Deserts

By Devra Ferst

iStock

As you know, we at JCarrot love pickles (try our quick summer pickle recipes here). Serious Eats shares some creative ways to use leftover pickle juice. They also conduct a jarred pickle taste test. See which pickle is the winner.

In this week’s New York Times dining section, Julia Moskin writes about how to use commonly discarded parts of vegetables. The Perennial Plate conveniently shares a recipe and video of how to make carrot top pesto.

Jon-Jon Goulian, author of “The Man in the Gray Flannel Skirt,” makes rugelach pinwheels on Cooking the Books.

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Mixing Bowl: Pastrami Galore, Rugelach Added to Dictionary, Libyan Jewish Cuisine

By Devra Ferst

iStock

This month’s issue of Saveur focuses on all variates sandwiches and of course takes a look at the great Katz’s deli. They share Katz’s recipe for chopped liver and a great video on the 2nd Avenue Deli’s pastrami.

Can you handle more pastrami? If so, check out Jamie Geller’s recipe for pastrami kugel on kosher.com.

In Rome, writer and sommelier Katie Parla, finds culinary traces of the former Jewish community of Libya, on The Atlantic.

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Kitchen Talk: Sarabeth on Brunch and Rugelach

By Devra Ferst

Quentin Bacon

Baking is caught somewhere between a science and an art. Chemical reactions take place at the same time as layers of cake are artfully constructed or sugar is exquisitely pulled and colored. Mastering both the art and the science takes endless hours of practice or unfailingly good guidance. It is just this type of guidance that Sarabeth Levine, the owner of Sarabeth’s restaurants and jam maker, shares with home bakers in her new book “Sarabeth’s Bakery, From My Hands to Yours.”

Her career started with a secret family recipe for Orange-Apricot Marmalade, which she served at her husband’s café and grew from there. For the past 30 years she has been baking breakfast treats and whipping up silken eggs at her restaurants, which helped revolutionize the city’s brunch scene.

Drizzled throughout her book are recipes for a several traditional Jewish baked goods. Her rugelach, which former New York Times Dining columnist Mimi Sheraton calls “the best rugelach in New York and the best I have ever had this side of my grandmother’s kitchen,” are rich with cream cheese and crisp on top. Her babka is a riff on a traditional recipe, made with a breakfast Danish dough.

She talked with us about the roots of her recipes, being a self-taught baker and just how important technique (and flour selection) is in baking. She also shares with us her rugelach and babka recipes.

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Mixing Bowl: Jewish Farms, Schnecken vs. Rugelach, Jewish Farms Sprout

By Devra Ferst

What exactly is the difference between rugelach and schnecken? Joan Nathan goes after the sweet history of these two desserts on Tablet.

What to do with leftover Kiddush wine? Israeli wine blog HaKerem finds some bizarre answers via twitter.

Looking for an Indian dinner recipe? My Jewish Learning shares a recipe for saag chevre, a spin on the classic saag paneer.

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'Rugelach by a Brother' — Lee Lee's Bakery

By Sarah Seltzer

Simon Vozick-Levinson

I have a confession… I used to be a commercial rugelach kinda gal. The actual bakery variety never tempted me. I always enjoyed the chewy, soft, slightly Pillsbury-like texture of Green’s cinnamon rugelach and the house brand from Zabar’s. I couldn’t even keep a bag of them in my apartment for fear of unfettered overindulgence.

All that changed, however, when I moved to Harlem, a historically black neighborhood, this winter and discovered one of the last purveyors of butter-dough rugelach in the New York City on West 118th street — Lee Lee’s bakery. The shop, which opened about a decade ago after moving from Amsterdam Avenue, is known by the sign that used to be painted on in its window advertising “Rugelach by a Brother” (that would be Alvin Lee Smalls, aka “Mr. Lee” the man behind Lee Lee’s).

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