The Jew And The Carrot

Passover Recipe: How To Cook Like a Turk

By Hana Itzhaki

There’s a good reason we only eat Kalli’ah once a year. The Turkish inspired beef, eggs and potato dish is not for the faint of heart. Seriously, if you have high cholesterol, just stop reading now. But if you enjoy the succulent rich taste of confit, this is the perfect Passover dish for you.

This recipe was handed down to me by my husband’s family. Israelis since long before Israel was a democratic nation, his ancestors originally emigrated from Turkey but identify their cultural heritage as Nashdidanim — a Jewish group from the secluded mountainous boarders of Turkey, Iran, and Azerbaijan that dates back to the Babylonian exile. Many of their food customs resemble those of the Turks and Kurds with dishes that include stuffed grape leaves known as dolma and meat filled kubbe dumplings poached in soup or served fried. Kalli’ah is one of the community’s signature Passover dishes.

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Snacks To Help You Survive Passover

By Danielle Ziri

We’re half way through Passover and if you’re anything like me, you’re starting to crave all of those delicious carbs that the Atkin’s diet and the rabbis frown upon this time of year — bread, pastries, cake, pizza, pasta and even beer.

In Israel, food companies and some creative chefs have found ways around the holiday’s restriction coming up with kosher for Passover chocolate wafers, soup croutons and even bagels — yes, bagels. Some of them work better than others, so here’s what to try and what to avoid during the last few days of the holiday.

“Afifiyot” Chocolate Wafers

Wafers are a classic in Israel. During Passover, the brand Elit brings out its “Afifiyot”. By the look, they are exactly the same as the regular chocolate wafer: rectangles indented with little square designs and filled with chocolate. In color, however, they are much less golden and more of a white with a grey undertone.

If you can get past the cardboard texture of the wafer, then you may actually find them better than the regular ones. It’s as if the makers of “Afifiyot” felt bad for not being able to provide us with the actual wafer and so they overcompensated with a rich dark chocolate. No complaints here!

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Manischewitz: Now Brought to You by Bain Capital

By Haaretz

Matzot on a cooling conveyor Manischewitz factory in Newark, New Jersey. Photo by Bloomberg via Haaretz

Kosher food giant Manischewitz, whose matzot are known to generations of Jews in the United States and elsewhere, is expected to announce on Tuesday that it has been purchased by Sankaty Advisors, an arm of the private equity giant Bain Capital.

The deal, which comes just a few days before Passover, is expected to help the 126-year-old company expand beyond the kosher aisle, the New York Times reported.

Under its new owner, a firm with expertise in revamping corporate strategy, the company is expected to promote “kosher” as a quality-control designation, rather than a simply religious one.

Though private equity tends to conjure images of stripping companies, Sankaty plans to act as “stewards of the brand,” said a person briefed on the deal who was not authorized to speak publicly about it before the announcement.

“It’s a pretty powerful certification to be kosher, because it means you are holding your product to a very high standard,” said Mark Weinsten, the newly appointed interim chief executive of Manischewitz, who is also a senior managing director at FTI Consulting. “Why is that not applicable to people who don’t keep kosher?”

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