The Jew And The Carrot

Waging the War for Food Trucks

By Elizabeth Alpern

When asked which was harder, dealing with city regulations of opening a food truck or taking on the challenges of kashrut for a restaurant on wheels, Lowell Bernstein, co-owner of Takosher in Los Angeles, the first ever Glatt kosher taco truck, replied, “kashrut, without a question.” Takosher’s owners spent months working out a “kosher program” with rabbis, and that was after the long search for a mashgiach, or kosher supervisor, even up for the job.

But kashrut is not the only challenge Bernstein and other food truck owners are facing. Running a food truck is wrought with obstacles. In many cities across the U.S., including Los Angeles, the hub of the current American food truck craze, the proliferation of food trucks has been met with less than open arms by some. City officials in Washington, DC and Sacramento have introduced legislation making it tough for trucks to open and keep operating. They claim food carts unfairly compete with brick and mortar businesses, ignore zoning laws, leaving behind litter and overstaying their welcome in precious urban parking spaces.

Read more



Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.