The Jew And The Carrot

Katz's Wins the Name Game Battle

By Laila Kearney

(Reuters) — The New York City delicatessen Katz’s has won a legal battle to force a Florida restaurant to change its name, according to court documents made public on Monday.

Katz’s Delicatessen, founded in 1888, sued Katz’s Deli of Deerfield Beach in June, claiming that the Florida restaurant had blatantly infringed on its trademark rights and tried to profit illegally from its name and reputation.

Both establishments sell Jewish and Kosher-style deli food.

Katz’s Delicatessen of Deerfield agreed to change its name in the settlement, which was signed in Manhattan federal court last week.

The Deerfield Beach restaurant owner, Charles Re, said he agreed to the change because keeping the name was not worth the legal troubles.

“It wasn’t something that we needed to have to sustain ourselves,” Re said.

Re, who is originally from the New York City borough of the Bronx, said he would change the name of his restaurant to Zak’s Deli.

Katz’s Delicatessen in Manhattan’s Lower East Side has been seen in a several movies including and in television shows such as “Law & Order” and shows on Food Network and Travel Channel.

Its best-known screen appearance may be in the 1989 romantic comedy “When Harry Met Sally,” with the character played by Meg Ryan faking an orgasm during a meal with Billy Crystal’s character.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli, jewish, food, florida

Katz's Deli in Florida? Fuggedaboudit!

By Michael Kaminer

Katz’s Deli is going for seconds.

Three months after suing a New York City food truck called Katz & Dogz for allegedly infringing on its good name, Katz’s Deli is back in court, filing a suit against the other Katz’s Delicatessen — you know, the one in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Never heard of it? Neither had we until this week.

“This hadn’t happened in years, and now we’ve got two in three months,” lamented Jake Dell, the third-generation owner of the original — and true — Katz’s. “We’ve had a pretty well-protected trademark for a long time, and it covers just about all variations of Katz’s.”

Katz’s in Deerfield uses katzs-deli as its web address and its menu is a “total ripoff” of Katz’s in New York, Dell said. There’s “Katz’s Famous Salami” at $11.99 a pound, (though no mention about of whether you can send it to ‘Your Boy in the Army’ as Katz’s slogan has kibitzed since WWII). There’s also “Matzo brie” ($4.89) and sandwiches like the “Henney Youngman” — a straight-up Reuben — for $11.75. The Florida spot also offers baked ham and cheese hero sandwiches and a BLT — things you’d never find at Katz’s on Houston.

A lawsuit was a last resort, according to Dell, who told the Forward his pleas to Florida Katz’s went unanswered. “I told them, ‘Look, I’d rather not to go courts or pay a lawyer. I’ll give you the benefit of doubt and offer you a month to change the name’,” Dell said. “They never got back to me, and when they finally did, they just kept delaying.”

The name “has confused a lot of people,” said Dell, whose official Katz’s title is “Top Dog.” A local Fort Lauderdale website reported last month: “The bad news is that it’s not related to the original Katz’s Deli in New York; it’s owned by a dude named Bruce Falaski.”

Photo: Katz’s Deli, Deerfield Beach.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli

Katz's Deli Defies Flood To Stay Open

By Renee Ghert-Zand

World-famous Katz’s Delicatessen remains open for business following a water main break right in front of it at the intersection of E. Houston and Ludlow Streets on the Lower East Side on Thursday morning.

The break is reported to have taken place took shortly before 11 a.m., and all lanes of East Houston Street were closed in both directions between Allen and Essex Streets.

New York City’s Office of Emergency Management issued an alert at 11:45 AM, warning drivers to expect road closures, traffic delays, and emergency personnel in the area, and to consider taking alternate routes. There was no response from OEM to a request for further information on the situation.

“The water main burst right in front of us,” Jake Dell, a fifth generation owner of Katz’s Deli told the Forward. The street had apparently completely collapsed, leaving a huge sinkhole.

“Our basement is flooded, as are probably the basements of all the other buildings on the block,” Dell said. “But upstairs is okay and we are open for business.”

The flooding in the basement destroyed everything that had been stored there. “All our dry goods are destroyed, so we won’t be able to make more of certain menu items once they run out,” he explained. “We won’t be able to make any more of our soups, because we don’t have any water.”

Dell, his staff, and Katz’s customers are not going to let the flood get in the way of serving and eating a good pastrami sandwich. The situation is certainly no worse than when the restaurant was hit hard by Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. Despite a major power outage and difficulty in accessing supplies, Katz’s stayed open. The kitchen operated on a generator, and customers ate by candlelight.

“A little bit of water never hurt anyone,” said Dell this morning, as water rushed down the street and sidewalk in front of his deli.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: new york, katz's deli, flood

Katz's Wins in a Battle of the 'Reuben Orgasm'

By Michael Kaplan

Katz’s Deli is the one and only Katz’s in town — and don’t you forget it.

The 125-year-old deli recently won a legal battle against a food truck called “Katz & Dogz,” arguing that the moniker was an attempt to co-opt the famed-restaurant’s name.

“It has taken over a century of dedication, hard work and consistent customer satisfaction for Katz’s Deli to become famous,” the trademark-infringement suit said. The $1 million lawsuit argued that appropriating the iconic name would ultimately lead customers to confuse the truck with Katz’s Deli and lead people to believe they were associated.

The truck also had to drop its motto, “Are you ready for the Reuben Orgasm?” which the lawsuit asserted was a reference to a famous scene shot at the deli in the movie “When Harry Met Sally.”

The truck is now going by the decidedly less exciting name, “Deli & Dogs.”

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli

It's Katz v. Katz as Deli Sues Food Truck

By Daniel Wiessner

Wikipedia

(Reuters) — The owners of New York City’s iconic Katz’s Delicatessen filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the operators of local food trucks named Katz & Dogz, claiming the trucks are a blatant attempt to dupe consumers.

Customers are likely to assume that the trucks, which sell the same Jewish-style fare, and the famed deli are somehow affiliated, according to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Manhattan.

The deli’s owners are seeking an order to bar the trucks from using any name that could easily be confused with Katz’s.

Katz’s, located on Manhattan’s Lower East Side since 1888, is among the city’s best-known eateries.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli, katz, dogz

Introducing Katz's Chocolate Egg Cream Candle

By Devra Ferst

Katz’s Deli

If Jewish food were to have a signature scent, it would be the smell of Katz’s deli — at least for me. The aroma of corned beef brined in spices, pastrami dripping with fat, fried potato knishes and freshly sliced rye assaults the senses the second you reach the door at the corner of Ludlow Street and East Houston.

Now the deli wants you to bring a small part of that scent home. Allow me to introduce the chocolate egg cream candle. According to Katz’s website, the candles which come in vintage-style packaging and costs $25 can “Transform any room into a delicious blast from the past. These delightful candles are sure to sweeten up your day.”

All of this is well and good — and I’ve already ordered one for my desk — but, the real scent of Katz’s is that killer pastrami. So to the owners, I have to ask you, “When’s the pastrami sandwich candle going to debut? I like mine cut from the dekel and with just a shmear of mustard.”

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli, katz's candle, chocolate egg cream

The Gabila's Knish Crisis Is Over!

By Devra Ferst

Like all knish lovers, we at the Forward shed a tear when we heard that Gabila’s, the king of the fried square knish, was forced to shut down its factory after a fire last fall. Five months later, the knish drought is almost over.

On Monday, the Long Island factory will once again smell of delicious potatoes fried in oil (imagine the scent of latkes, year-round). If they get back up to full steam, the company will make as many as 250,000 knishes in its first week.

Up to 2,000 of those knishes will be sold in a week at Katz’s Deli, which was forced to take the knishes off of their menu last fall, according to owner Jake Dell. At the deli diners resorted to eating potato salad and French fries while more desperate knish devotees turned to eBay to get their fix.

For everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the knish, you’ll just have to wait for May for “Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food.” In the meantime, we’re content to just snack on those square knishes.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: knishes, katz's deli, Gabila's

125 Years of Katz's Deli

By Lauren Rothman

Bauer and Dean Publishers

There are a handful of New York City landmarks that most people recognize: Lady Liberty. The Chrysler Building. And Katz’s Delicatessen.

Opened on the Lower East Side in 1888 and purchased by the Russian Katz family in 1903, the delicatessen famous for its orgasmic pastrami sandwiches, its Friday evening frankfurters ‘n’ beans and its Cel-Ray soda is one of the oldest continually operating businesses in New York City. And, at the ripe age of 125, Katz’s is still going strong: each week, the deli serves up more than 10,000 pounds of pastrami, 6,000 pounds of corned beef, and 4,000 hot dogs to locals and tourists alike. That’s a lot of cow.

Katz’s has attracted its fair share of attention over the years. But no one had ever written a book about it until now. In September, current part owner Jake Dell wrote the introduction to Katz’s: Autobiography of a Delicatessen in which he traces the famed storefront’s evolution from a tight-knit neighborhood joint to a star-studded celebrity hangout at the height of the early 1900s Yiddish theatre boom to a can’t-miss tourist attraction in the oughts. Large-format, full-color photos by Baldomero Fernandez detailing every nook and cranny of the restaurant accompany Dell’s text.

When it comes to publishing food or cookbooks, it’s usually the restaurant chef or owner that approaches the publisher with an idea. But in the case of Katz’s, Dell said, it was Bauer and Dean Publishers that, a few years ago, came to him. With the big anniversary fast approaching, Dell thought the timing was perfect.

“It was kind of a no-brainer,” he said.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: pastrami, mile end, katzs deli, jewish, food, david sax, anniversary, 125

Katz's Deli Gets Artsy

By Margaret Eby

margaret eby

Want a side of art with that pastrami on rye? You’re in luck. As part of celebrations for the iconic Lower East Side deli’s 125th birthday, Katz’s Deli commissioned the space next door to their restaurant to use as a pop-up gallery.

The Space at Katz’s, as the gallery is dubbed, merges the old and new Lower East Sides, exhibiting deli-inspired artwork. The pop-up opened on October 22, and will be open to the public until February, cycling in new work every month.

The initial offerings at the space includes a wall-sized scrawl by fashion designer and artist Baron Von Fancy which reads “I’ll have what she’s having,” the quip from the famous scene set in Katz’s in “When Harry Met Sally.” Artist Hanksy, famous for his street art-style spins off of celebrity culture, contributed a portrait of comedian Will Ferrell in a cat costume dubbed “Will Feral Katz.” The show also includes several pieces by Studio Hyp-Inc made from carefully broken vinyl records in the shape of sandwiches.

Along with the rotating art, The Space serves as a store for Katz’s merchandise. Every month, a different designer will riff on the Katz’s deli standards to produce t-shirts, baseball caps, and event specialized sneakers. New York City-based designer Alife is The Space’s initial collaborator, offering Katz’s caps and t-shirts inspired by one of the deli’s slogans, “Send a salami to your boy in the army.”

The current exhibit at the The Space, at 203 East Houston Street, runs until November 24.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli

New York Faces a Knish Crisis

By Lucy Cohen Blatter

gabila's

Bad news for fried knish lovers: New York is in the midst of a shortage.

Gabila’s, the country’s largest producer of fried knishes (which according to its website has sold over a billion doughy pockets), has had to suspend production of its “Coney Island Squares” until at least the end of November. The reason: a small fire that broke out in the company’s Long Island factory on September 24.

Gabila’s supplies many of the city’s delis and hot dog carts with their fried knishes (which can best be described as mashed potatoes wrapped in fried dough, and which go incredibly well with mustard alongside a deli sandwich). Delis from Katz’s on the Lower East Side to Essen New York Deli in Midwood are out of them.

“Believe me, if I could give you a square knish, I’d give you a square knish. I just can’t right now,” Katz’s fifth-generation owner Jake Dell told CBS News.

Katz’s normally sells 1,500 of these knishes a week (for $3.75 each), according to CBS.

So what does this mean for those of us craving knishes? For the next month you’ll either have to go with the round, baked variety (which sell for 50 cents more at Katz’s) — which are often homemade at delis and restaurants — or try to go over a month without knishes. Hey, your waistline might thank you.

If you’d like to make your own, check out a cooking video from The Forverts.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: knish, katz's deli

Robert Sietsema's New York Taste Buds

By Anne Cohen

Courtesy of Robert Sietsema
Masked Man: One of the last anonymous critics, Robert Sietsema poses here in his signature quirky mask.

If you’re a person who spends their weekends schlepping to the outer-boroughs for a taste of New York’s best ethnic cuisines, or, if you are a dedicated reader of the Village Voice, or just a person who likes to eat in the city, you owe a debt to Robert Sietsema.

Sietsema’s taste buds have been New York’s flavor barometer for over 25 years. Starting with “Down the Hatch,” followed by a stint at Gourmet and finally serving as the Village Voice’s restaurant critic for 20 years, he has chronicled the city’s food scene longer than almost any other critic, uncovering hidden gems and whole-in-the-wall ethnic restaurants one review at a time.

His memorable tenure at the Voice came to an abrupt end when Sietsema was somewhat unceremoniously fired in May, along with gossip columnist Michael Musto, and theater critic Michael Feingold.

Fortunately for readers, Sietsema has found a new home at EaterNY, covering what he calls his “natural beat.” As a regular columnist, he’ll continue his pursuit of the perfect dish through a series of “micro-neighborhood dining guides.”

The Forward’s Anne Cohen recently spoke with Sietsema about his take on the future of food journalism, his favorite New York deli, and what he really thinks of gefilte fish.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Robert Sietsema, Katz's Deli, Grub Street, Eater, Best Bagel in NYC, Best New York Bagel

Meet the Last Jewish Waiter — at Katz's Deli

By Maia Efrem

Baldomero Fernandez

When David Manheim first started working at Katz’s Deli, he was a teenager promoting their delivery service and was paid in sandwiches. When he came back five years ago as a waiter, he knew he wouldn’t leave until he made something to showcase the soul of Katz’s, as he pegs it: “The Empire State Building of the Lower East Side.” This deli will celebrate its 125th year serving up some of the best pastrami in town on June 2nd, and it’s only fitting that it serves some old school Jewish humor with the slaw.

A Manhattan native, Manheim, 38, first got the attention of the food, and Jewish, world in late April when he launched his blog The Last Jewish Waiter with an accompanying hilarious video of the shenanigans behind the counter (where all the magic happens) and his often welcome abuse of Katz’s patrons. Deciding to film the deli, Manheim eschewed the reality show mold, which he feels is often fake and opted for a behind-the-scenes feel. “I’ve always been interested in shows that show the process and aren’t pretentious. That’s my vision for this, it should be just like The Muppet Show, a show about making a show yet shows the imperfections of a team.”

Growing up in Chelsea to parents who are both teachers, Manheim was on two different cable shows when he was younger and knew he was comfortable on camera. After a brief stint in Los Angeles, Manheim returned to New York and started waiting tables at Katz’s, which he hopes is only a stepping-stone to the next phase of his career. “I love talking to people and I love it when it’s good,” Manheim told the Forward. “I just have a problem with authority and I don’t particularly like to be told what to do, which is funny for a waiter.”

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Last Jewish Waiter, Katz's deli

Happy 125th Birthday, Katz's Deli! To Many More Years of Pastrami

By Susan Armitage

Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Since Katz’s, that holiest of holy sites for pastrami worship, opened in 1888, Yiddish theatre actors, immigrants from countless countries, politicians, movie stars and grandparents visiting from Florida have come to fress on the deli’s superb sandwiches. The Jewish food landmark turns 125 this weekend, so to celebrate, we took a walk down memory lane, from the early days before the deli was called Katz’s to Meg Ryan’s “Oh, my God” moment to the deli’s first-ever Passover Seder this year.

This weekend, Katz’s kicks off its birthday party, hosting a Shabbat dinner that melds deli with another long-standing Jewish tradition: Chinese food. Chef Danny Bowien of Mission Chinese, who recently won a James Beard Award, will put his own spin on Katz’s classics. He’ll be joined by Bill Telepan of Telepan, Joey Campanaro of The Little Owl and pastry chef Sarabeth Levine.

The anniversary celebration continues with live music at Katz’s this Saturday and a pastrami-eating competition on Sunday. Too much of a good thing? Never! Ess gesunt!

Share your favorite Katz’s Deli memory with us in the comments!

(To scroll through the years of Katz’s, click on the right of the images below.)

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: pastrami, katz's deli, danny bowien, 125th birthday

The Last Jewish Waiter at Katz's Deli

By Maia Efrem

Wikicommons

Seth Meyers may have just been named as the next host of “Late Night” on NBC but we have our eyes on someone a little different. Meet David Manheim, foul-mouthed waiter at iconic Katz’s Deli by day, aspiring TV host by night. Not waiting for kismet to work its magic, Manheim, chronicles his life at the soon-to-be 125 year old deli on his blog “The Last Jewish Waiter.” Only blogging since April 20th, Manheim’s voice is a breath of fresh air in its unapologetic hatred of his job, his mistreatment (or some might say, New York treatment) of his customers and his comedic take on Jews and gentiles alike.

With an analysis of every type of customer, Manheim’s most interesting takes are those on the different types of Jews he serves. There are the easygoing, rich Jews who relocated to the South now making a pilgrimage back to the New York deli of their roots who delight in his mistreatment of them. And the Jews visiting from out of town impressing their family with their knowledge of all thing Katz. “I have to say, these guys crack me up,” writes Manheim, “they have determined that a square knish from Katz’s will finally open the dormant Jewish gene in their half-Jew daughter. I feel like they think one bite and the girl will be reciting a Haftarah portion.”

No doubt Manheim, who says he is 38, is among scores of Jewish waiters who hate their customers and have more than a few colorful words for them, the only difference is that he’s the only one with enough chutzpah to say it to your face. The controlled DMV-like chaos at Katz is unacceptable at a restaurant, writes Manheim, but he revels in it, “I love it! I throw silverware at the customers, refuse to serve certain items, and am generally nasty. With a certain understood kindness at the bottom.” Charm us, he does.

Check out his first video below:

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: pastrami, last jewish waiter, david manheim, Katz's deli

Mixing Bowl: Hanukkah Edition

By Devra Ferst

Thinkstock

If you’re going to take advice from someone on how to make a proper latke, that person should be Melissa Clark. [New York Times]

Everything you ever wanted to know about hosting a latke party. [Serious Eats]

Latkes goes modernist. [Saveur]

Try them with….brown butter and cinnamon applesauce. [Serious Eats]

Looking to celebrate the holiday of oil without covering your kitchen in it? Here’s a great list of events. [Serious Eats]

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: katz's deli, hanukkah, donuts, latkes

Mixing Bowl: H&H Fight, Katz's Deli Is 'Manly?'

By Devra Ferst

iStock

The fight over the H&H Bagel name continues to get shmeared. [Grub Street]

School lunches are getting a healthy makeover thanks to Michelle Obama’s initiatives. But not so much for students who keep kosher in LA. [Jewish Journal]

Katz’s Deli might just be the “manliest” sandwich shop in America, atleast according to Men’s Health Guy Gourmet blog. [Village Voice]

Food and Wine spends some time with (and gets some recommendations from) our favorite Israeli spice master Lior Lev Sercarz. [Food and Wine]

The barbeque brisket pop-up BrisketTown is starting to take orders…. hmmm, we’ll see you in line. [Eater]

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: H and H, Katz's Deli, Lior Lev Sercarz

Best Jewish Sandwich — Readers' Choice

By Molly Yeh

In last week’s food section, we gave you 10 amazing Jewish sandwiches from across the country, which in true “top list” fashion sparked some debate over which sandwiches were really the best and which were missing from the list. Luckily, a tidy little poll let readers kvetch constructively by voting for their favorite (with a write-in option). With over 600 votes, favorites were all across the board — and world.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Deli Board, Katz's Deli, Mile End, Best Jewish Sandwiches in America

Food Noir: Adam Richman Plays Culinary Detective, Part 2

By Eitan Kensky

Flickr: SpecialKRB

In this two-part series Eitan Kensky takes a sharp look at food travel shows and the evolution of Adam Richman’s popular show “Man vs. Food.” Read Part 1 here.

One of the most striking elements of “Man vs. Food” was the way it flattened all ethnicities into generic American challenges. The idea of de-emphasizing difference made it rare, if not unique among food shows. Both of Travel Channel host Andrew Zimmern’s shows were built around the idea of eating local and indigenous cuisines that most American’s find disgusting, such as unborn chicken eggs, squirrel and calf (testicles) — especially when the exotic locations Zimmern traveled to were in America, like the Gulf Coast, or the immigrant neighborhoods of New York and Los Angeles. “Man vs. Food,” however, didn’t exoticize ethnic foods or treat them as an other to be discovered; rather ethnic restaurants were just another way to experience over-sized, over-seasoned, or over-spiced American portions.

This approach was especially prominent during the first season when Richman visited Katz’s Deli in New York. The show went out of its way to not make reference to Katz’s Jewish origins. None of the patrons interviewed appeared to be Jewish and Richman treated Katz’s only as a general New York institution that serves very meaty sandwiches. There were, it’s true, a few codes for Jewishness in the presentation. Richman’s mother came to share the food with him, and he referred to her as the person who first introduced him to Deli, but he left out why she introduced him to it in the first place. His mother worried that his upcoming challenge would be “unhealthy,” making shtick out of the stereotype of the over-protective Jewish mother, but it backfires. Given the toxic spiciness of the food Richman is going to ingest later that night, the Brick Lane Curry House’s spicy p’haal, allegedly the world’s hottest curry, she isn’t so much the over-protective Jewish mother as the voice of reason. Nonetheless, it was striking that a 21st century food show didn’t mention that Deli is a Jewish food par excellence, and Richman’s mother presumably took him to delis as part of his heritage.

(Video below)

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Man vs Food Nation, Man vs Food, Katz's Deli, Deli, Food TV, Andrew Zimmern, Adam Richman

Mixing Bowl: World Food Day; Schmaltz Brioche

By Devra Ferst

iStock

Food Curated visits the 100-year old iconic ACME smoked fish plant in Greenpoint, Brooklyn to see how smoked fish is really made. Um, can someone get us a bagel and schmear please?

As things gear up for October 17th’s World Food Day (an effort to fight world hunger), plans are underway for It’s Time to Eat Real, America!, “A nationwide campaign to change the way Americans eat and think about food,” its site says.

Serious Eats’ Cook The Book column shares a recipe for “The Israeli Workingman’s Sandwich,” courtesy of “The Big New York Sandwich Book.”

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Schmaltz Brioche, World Food Day, Mixing Bowl, Katz's Deli, Gold Coast Deli, Food Curated, ACME Fish

Mixing Bowl: Pastrami Galore, Rugelach Added to Dictionary, Libyan Jewish Cuisine

By Devra Ferst

iStock

This month’s issue of Saveur focuses on all variates sandwiches and of course takes a look at the great Katz’s deli. They share Katz’s recipe for chopped liver and a great video on the 2nd Avenue Deli’s pastrami.

Can you handle more pastrami? If so, check out Jamie Geller’s recipe for pastrami kugel on kosher.com.

In Rome, writer and sommelier Katie Parla, finds culinary traces of the former Jewish community of Libya, on The Atlantic.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Rugelach, Pastrami, Katz's Deli, Chozen, 2nd Avenue Deli, Saveur




Find us on Facebook!
  • Is anti-Zionism the new anti-Semitism?
  • "I thought I was the only Jew on a Harley Davidson, but I was wrong." — Gil Paul, member of the Hillel's Angels. http://jd.fo/g4cjH
  • “This is a dangerous region, even for people who don’t live there and say, merely express the mildest of concern about the humanitarian tragedy of civilians who have nothing to do with the warring factions, only to catch a rash of *** (bleeped) from everyone who went to your bar mitzvah! Statute of limitations! Look, a $50 savings bond does not buy you a lifetime of criticism.”
  • That sound you hear? That's your childhood going up in smoke.
  • "My husband has been offered a terrific new job in a decent-sized Midwestern city. This is mostly great, except for the fact that we will have to leave our beloved NYC, where one can feel Jewish without trying very hard. He is half-Jewish and was raised with a fair amount of Judaism and respect for our tradition though ultimately he doesn’t feel Jewish in that Larry David sort of way like I do. So, he thinks I am nuts for hesitating to move to this new essentially Jew-less city. Oh, did I mention I am pregnant? Seesaw, this concern of mine is real, right? There is something to being surrounded by Jews, no? What should we do?"
  • "Orwell described the cliches of politics as 'packets of aspirin ready at the elbow.' Israel's 'right to defense' is a harder narcotic."
  • From Gene Simmons to Pink — Meet the Jews who rock:
  • The images, which have since been deleted, were captioned: “Israel is the last frontier of the free world."
  • As J Street backs Israel's operation in Gaza, does it risk losing grassroots support?
  • What Thomas Aquinas might say about #Hamas' tunnels:
  • The Jewish bachelorette has spoken.
  • "When it comes to Brenda Turtle, I ask you: What do you expect of a woman repressed all her life who suddenly finds herself free to explore? We can sit and pass judgment, especially when many of us just simply “got over” own sexual repression. But we are obliged to at least acknowledge that this problem is very, very real, and that complete gender segregation breeds sexual repression and unhealthy attitudes toward female sexuality."
  • "Everybody is proud of the resistance. No matter how many people, including myself, disapprove of or even hate Hamas and its ideology, every single person in Gaza is proud of the resistance." Part 2 of Walid Abuzaid's on-the-ground account of life in #Gaza:
  • After years in storage, Toronto’s iconic red-and-white "Sam the Record Man" sign, complete with spinning discs, will return to public view near its original downtown perch. The sign came to symbolize one of Canada’s most storied and successful Jewish family businesses.
  • Is $4,000 too much to ask for a non-member to be buried in a synagogue cemetery?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.