The Jew And The Carrot

Piety: Divine Pies Delivered to Your Door

By Elizabeth Traison

Piety’s honey-fig-plum pie (left) and rosemary-peach (right). Photograph by Elizabeth Traison

When it comes to a good pie, there are a few important factors that distinguish the edible from the incredible. Starting with the crust, which should be flaky and light but also capable of both standing up to and also complementing whatever goodness makes up the filling. While there are seemingly infinite possibilities when it comes to fillings, finding the right balance of ingredients — most notably, seasonal fruits and herbs — that marry together in a way that will make your mouth water is no easy task. Piety, Brooklyn’s newest kosher pie bakery, rises to the challenge.

Just from speaking to Rebecca Greenberg, founder and owner of Piety, you know she makes good pies. The patience, tenderness and kindness that come naturally to her personality (characteristics that were further developed by previous careers in education and child care), also make their way into her pies. “Baking a pie isn’t fast,” she says. “It takes time, patience and thoughtfulness” — and you know she’s speaking from experience. Crust and filling can make or break a good pie, but it’s these additional qualities that put a good pie over the top.

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Compote of Pears in Wine Sauce

By Fannie Engle and Gertrude Blair

A recipe from 1954 holds up pretty well with a few small variations. Photograph by Liza Schoenfein

Serves 6

6 medium-size green winter pears
Water to cover
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1 tablespoon lemon juice
A few slivers of ginger root or crystalized ginger
½ cup sugar
1 cup Concord wine (or to cover)

Wash and pare (peel) the fruit and add just enough water to cover. Cook until tender but not too soft, about 30 minutes. Pour out about 3/4 of the water. Add remaining ingredients (adding more wine so liquid just covers pears) and simmer for about 10 minutes. Chill and serve in the sauce. If pears are large, cut in halve sand core before cooking.

Adapted from “The Jewish Festival Cookbook” by Fannie Engle and Gertrude Blair (David McKay Company Inc. 1954)

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The Making of a Plum-Perfect Honey Cake

By Liza Schoenfein

Photograph by Liza Schoenfein

I’ve had honey cake on the brain lately. I know: Haven’t we all?

But I can say with confidence that I’ve been more immersed in honey-cake contemplation than the average Jewish woman approaching the High Holy Days.

Not only did I just interview Rose Levy Beranbaum about her glorious version of this Rosh Hashanah classic — the recipe is here — but I was also recently tasked with developing a gluten-free honey cake. And I went through several failed attempts before coming up with one I could be proud of, a cake that was moist and not too sweet, which involved a combination of regular gluten-free flour and lovely, flavorful almond meal.

So there’s been a lot of honey cake happening in my kitchen these days.

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Recipe: Plum-Perfect Honey Cake

By Liza Schoenfein

This gluten-free take on a Rosh Hashanah classic incorporates Italian plums for a seasonal twist. Photograph by Liza Schoenfein

Cooking spray
4 Italian plums, halved lengthwise and pits removed
¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon raw sugar, divided
1½ cups almond flour/meal, such as Bob’s Red Mill
½ cup gluten-free all purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 eggs, beaten
¼ cup coconut oil or olive oil
3/4 cup honey
¼ cup coffee

1) Preheat oven to 350˚ F. Spray a nonstick bundt pan with cooking spray, and lay plums skin-side down evenly around the bottom of the pan. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of the sugar.

2) Whisk dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a small bowl, combine eggs, oil, honey, and coffee. Add wet ingredients to dry, stirring to combine. Pour into bundt pan and cook on middle rack of the oven for about one hour, until a skewer inserted in the cake comes out clean. Let the cake cool in the pan for a few minutes. Slide a thin sharp knife between the cake and the pan before turning cake out onto a cake plate.

Liza Schoenfein is the new food editor of the Forward. Contact her at schoenfein@forward.com.

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Israel's 12 Sweetest Treats — And Where To Find Them

By Rotem Maimon

Photo by David Silverman

(Haaretz)— Israel has made great strides in the numbers of patisseries and boulangeries that have opened here, and many of the top pastry chefs have honed their craft abroad, but is there such a thing as a real Israeli dessert? We asked chefs from 12 leading restaurants to describe their most Israeli desserts. Taste and decide for yourself.

1) Catit

The dessert: olive oil sable, blood orange crème, ginger crème, tapioca tuile, buttermilk foam, rose petals and hibiscus dust, olive oil and white chocolate ice cream.

Pastry chef Hila Perry: “The olive oil is Israeli, as is the citrus – the blood orange – that surrounds it. And the buttermilk always reminds me of that childhood treat, Daniela whipped pudding, in its best form.”


2) Herbert Samuel in Herzliya (kosher):

The dessert: Mount Bracha tahini. Tahini sorbet, espresso granite, sesame tuile.

Pastry chef Shlomi Palensya: “We wanted something Israeli that would fit the rules of kashrut and also appeal to tourists. We started with a tahini sorbet then we thought ‘What would make it more interesting?’ So we made a sesame tuile and added coffee granite, and it immediately became one of our signature dishes.”

Photo by David Silverman


3) Kitchen Market:

The dessert: Israeli cheesecake with black olives, strawberries and yogurt sorbet

Pastry chef Yossi Sheetrit: “This cheesecake is something you can find in any Israeli household, except that we’ve added a little twist. The flavors are very Israeli: cheese, olives and olive oil.”

Photo by David Silverman


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RIP Hostess Brands

By Ruth Abusch-Magder

Getty Images

Ding Dongs hold a special place in my heart. My best friend growing up in Canada was an American. Whenever her family would travel to New York they would bring numerous boxes of Ring Dings back with them and keep them in the freezer. Sure, there were lots of similar sandwich cakes in the great white north, but none had a hechsher. If we were particularly well behaved, we would be allowed to take one from the coveted stash. The memory of the feeling of the frozen squishy cake and its filling, still brings a smile to my face.

With the announcement of the closure of the Hostess brand, the memories of Ring Dings resurfaced. I found myself mulling the loss of an item I have not eaten since before my bat mitzvah. The public discussion of the closure of the Hostess plants centers around the financial challenges the company faced as it sought to restructure. But even without the current financial downturn, the snack cakes may be part of the shifting American foodways.

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Cassola, Rome's Jewish Christmas Treat

By Alessandra Rovati

Alessandra Rovati

A popular Italian saying advises: “Dress like a Turk, and eat like a Jew.”

Jews have enjoyed an uninterrupted presence in Italy for more than 2,200 years, producing a delicious cuisine with almost endless regional variations, that profoundly affected broader Italian cuisine. Contrary to the all-too-common American assumption that most Jewish food is bland or boring, Jewish Italian cuisine tends to be seen as a delicacy by non-Jewish locals. Some of the most popular restaurants in Rome serve traditional Jewish dishes, like the famous fried artichokes.

Rome’s unofficial Christmas dessert, cassola, or a baked ricotta cheese cake, was originally a Jewish dish. In the 16th century, while some Jewish communities in Northern Italy made a fresh cheese baked sandwich-like dish sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon called pizza dolce, Roman Jews used ricotta to make large sweet pancakes cooked in a skillet. The dish was called “casciola” (from “cascio”, cheese), says Italian food historian A.Toaff in his “Mangiare alla Giudia.”

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Truffles, Date Cake and More — Passover Desserts From Four Famous Chefs

By Lucy Cohen Blatter

Food Network Magazine

Any chef will tell you that the secret to a great Passover dessert is not trying to make kosher-for-Passover versions of year-round cakes. Don’t even think about baking a loaf cake or pie that requires switching out cups of flour for loads of matzo meal or potato starch. Instead, stick to recipes that have little or no flour, or recipes that call for nuts instead of flour.

Flourless chocolate cake is the most well-known Passover-friendly dessert, but we checked in with four talented chefs — a Jewish cookbook author, a Food Network test-kitchen director, a fine-dining restaurateur and a Food Network host — for some more unusual recommendations. Whether it’s a refreshing granita, decadent chocolate truffle, a Mediterranean-style walnut and date cake or the more traditional mandel bread, we think these desserts are winners — on Passover and all year long.

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