The Jew And The Carrot

In the Rockies, a Jewish Food Movement Emerges

By Dvora Meyers

Cross-posted from JTA.

The new Jewish food movement arose in Boulder, Colo. organically, so to speak.

No large federation or organization swooped in to make sustainable farming and eating within a Jewish framework a priority.

Yet in this city of 100,000 — some 13,000 residents are Jewish — “green” has long been a way of life. So it’s not surprising that interest in sustainability has led to a variety of Jewish grass-roots projects such as the establishment of greenhouses in food deserts, a chicken and egg co-op, community farms and an organic chicken schechting (kosher butchering) project, along with — thanks to a $335,000 grant from three foundations — the arrival of Hazon, a national Jewish environmental group.

The grant, which brought Hazon to the region in December 2010, came from the Rose Foundation and the locally based Oreg Foundation and 18 Pomegranates.

On April 29, the partnership among the local funders, activists and environmental organizations will culminate with the Rocky Mountain Food Summit, which will be held at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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