The Jew And The Carrot

Jewel-Toned Winter Slaw

By Liza Schoenfein

Photograph by Liza Schoenfein

I’m nominating my friend Judy for the position of Slaw Queen. This evening, at her annual New Year’s open house, one of the delicious dishes on her buffet table was a gingery beet-and-carrot slaw in a lime dressing. It was beautiful to look at and even better to eat — light but incredibly satisfying. It felt like just the thing after so much holiday indulgence.

This weekend I think I’ll try to figure out the recipe.

A year ago, at a potluck at my house, Judy brought a similar-but-different salad, which she reproduced after eating one like it at Cookshop, and which I loved so much I quickly tried to make it myself. I’ve been concocting some version of it ever since, and first wrote about it on my Life, Death & Dinner blog. It’s full of flavor and extremely uplifting, with its gorgeous jewel tones.

To make quick work of it, use the grating blade on your food processor.

For the dressing:

¼ cup orange juice, reduced by half
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon maple syrup
¼ teaspoon salt
Freshly grated pepper
¼ cup hazelnut oil

For the salad:

4 large carrots, peeled and grated
4 beets (raw), peeled and grated
1 celery root, peeled and grated
1 head Tuscan kale, finely sliced
Seeds from a pomegranate
½ cup roasted, salted sunflower seeds
½ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

1) For the dressing, whisk everything but the oil together in a small bowl. Slowly drizzle in the oil, stirring continuously until fully incorporated. Set aside.

2) Combine salad ingredients in a large bowl and toss with half the dressing. Taste for seasoning, adding more salt, pepper and dressing as needed.

Liza Schoenfein is the food editor of the Forward. Contact her at schoenfein@forward.com.

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Celebrating Carrots In Their Own Right

By Katherine Martinelli

Katherine Martinelli

Although carrots often play a supporting role in the culinary world, I’ve long appreciated them in their own right. As a baby I turned a subtle hue of orange from consuming so much carrot puree, and as a child I happily mimicked my favorite cartoon character, Bugs Bunny, by chomping on carrots every chance I got. Apparently the world has caught up, since a recent New York Times article declared carrots the new Brussels sprouts.

Carrots probably originated in Afghanistan from a purple variety thousands of years ago, and have been enjoyed for their culinary and medicinal purposes ever since. Today they’re more popular than ever, with the average American eating nearly 10 pounds per year, according to a USDA report on the subject.

Though they have a long history, carrots don’t appear alongside the seven species of the Old Testament, and Gil Marks points out in The Encyclopedia of Jewish Cooking that “The carrot, never mentioned in the Talmud or Midrash, was a rather late arrival to the Middle East and Jewish cookery.”

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The Jews and Their Carrots

By Devra Ferst

iStock

This week The Jew and the Carrot celebrates the first anniversary of its re-launch. In honor of the milestone, we took a deeper look at the roots of our namesake veggie — the carrot and its tangled Jewish past.

Myths, both ancient and modern, abound around the orange veggie — some say it improves your eye sight, others claimed it aided in contraception, some quibble over the fact that orange carrots were created by botanists working under the House of Orange in Holland, and finally, others claim that Jews are responsible for the first written carrot cake recipe in America. Like most good legends, there’s a grain of truth and a whole of hullabaloo in these myths. So here are the facts:

First of all, carrots, and not just the ones sitting at the bottom of your vegetable drawer, are really old. Fossils of wild carrot pollen stretch back 55-34 million years, according to botanical researchers John Stolarzyk and Jules Janick. Since then, carrots have transformed from wild inedible roots to the sweet orange vegetable we know today.

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Mixing Bowl: Empire Chicken; Pork Memoirs and the 2nd Ave Deli

By Devra Ferst

iStock

Empire Kosher Poultry, the largest kosher chicken company in the country, claims “it produces a healthier, cleaner, more reliably kosher chicken than available anywhere else in America — and in a socially and environmentally responsible way,” according to JTA.

Multi-colored Carrots are coming to farmers’ markets this month! Yes, we have a soft spot for our namesake veggie.

A deli plate would be naked without a pickle, but the preserved cucumber wasn’t always so beloved. Jane Ziegelman writes that the pickle was once viewed as a stimulant and consumption was frowned upon.

The title of Mark Bittman’s Opinionator piece this week, “Can Big Food Regulate Itself? Fat Chance,” says it all.

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