The Jew And The Carrot

Indonesian Gadu Gadu

By Dana Weiss

Dana Weiss’s nanny’s version of Gadu Gadu

*Vegetarians can leave out the chicken

Serves four

Sauce
3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
I clove of garlic, crushed
2 heaped tablespoons of peanut butter (not sweet)
1 teaspoon cumin
3 teaspoons finely chopped parsley
A few stalks of lemongrass
2 tablespoons soya
½ cup coconut milk
3 tablespoons of finely chopped fresh coriander

Steamed vegetables
3 zucchinis peeled, halved (lengthways) and cut into thin strips
1 cauliflower broken up into florets
1 cabbage cut into thin strips
1 carrot halved (lengthways) and cut into thin strips

Chicken 3 chicken breasts cut into cubes of approximately 3x3cm
2 tablespoons cornflour

1) To prepare the sauce, place all the ingredients in a pan, except for the coriander, and cook uncovered over a low light for about 30 minutes. Add the fresh coriander and put to one side.

2) In a bamboo steamer, or a pot with straining holes, steam all the vegetables quickly—about 3 minutes, season and place in ice water to stop the cooking process and ensure that the vegetable remain crisp.

3) Heat a wide pan with a little oil and place the cornflour in a flat bowl. When the oil is hot roll the chicken cubes in the cornflour until they are fully covered. Gently shake off any excess flour and fry until browned. Place the cubes on a plate lined with absorbent paper towel.

4) To serve, divide up the vegetables and the chicken onto plates and pour the sauce over them. We recommend serving it with either rice or noodles.

About Dana Weiss: Dana Weiss is the presenter of the weekend news on Channel Two Israel. Previously she was the host of “Meet the Press” on the same channel. She is also a documentary producer, investigative journalist and a lawyer and a guest lecturer at the Sammy Ofer School of Communications at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya.

Recipe and photo: Courtesy of Jerusalem Season of Culture. Photographer: Yael Ilan

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Israel's First Food Truck Hits the Streets

By Renee Ghert-Zand

Tal Shahar
Dinner Time: AutoOchel stops at one of 25 different places around Jerusalem where locals can feast on food from chef Assaf Granit.

Food trucks seem to be ubiquitous these days — but not in Jerusalem. Until last week, a food truck had never rolled into the Holy City or into any city in Israel. But on July 17 a truck with a giant steaming pot sculpture on top and a chalkboard menu on its side, pulled opened its doors to feed hundreds of Jerusalemites.

Part public art and part performance the “AutoOchel” (food vehicle), which is captained by local celebrity chef Assaf Granit, is about much more than just food. For 25 days this summer (July 17-August 12), the truck will stop in a different neighborhood and serve a different dish each day. The locations and dishes are closely matched, and reflect the personal connections that 25 well-known local personalities have to the city. Each day, one of these participating celebrities will ride along with Granit and help him prepare and serve their special dish to the public.

The “AutoOchel” was conceived as a major event in the third annual Jerusalem Season of Culture, a summer showcase of Jerusalem’s flourishing arts scene and contemporary cultural treasures. Granit cooked up the idea with JSOC artistic director Itay Mautner. The two worked together closely on every aspect of this carefully choreographed “FoodTrip,” (as JSOC has translated “AutoOchel.”)

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Assaf Granit Is Changing Jerusalem's Food Scene

By Devra Ferst

Liz Clayman

On every plane that touches down in Israel, there is inevitably a group of people who head straight to the Kotel — no matter the hour, they feel they haven’t arrived in the Holy Land until they pray at the wall. I save the Kotel for later and make a pilgrimage straight to Shuk Machaneh Yehudah, Jerusalem’s longstanding market. Here, small wooden stalls are piled high daily with fresh produce grown around the country, fluffy pitas are turned straight from the ovens into bags for shoppers and the halvah men entice shoppers with samples from their endless mountains of the sweet sesame snack. Members of diverse communities converge here, particularly in the hours before Shabbat. It’s one of the divided city’s few points of common ground. It is my Jerusalem.

When I’m away from Israel, I follow the news of the shuk as closely as an outsider can. And even 6,000 miles away, the name Assaf Granit and his restaurant Machneyuda (which shares the same name as the market, but a different spelling) has rung loud and clear.

In 2009 Granit and his partners Uri Navon and Yossi Elad opened a restaurant located just beyond the edge of the market inspired by this bustling place. The chefs change the menu twice a day — an impressive feat for any restaurant, but even more notable in a country where the import of ingredients from other corners of the earth is often challenging.

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