The Jew And The Carrot

Urban Adamah Slaughters Chickens Privately After Controversy

By Andy Altman-Ohr

  • Print
  • Share Share

thinkstock

Urban Adamah privately slaughtered 15 chickens that were scheduled to be killed as part of a public kosher slaughter workshop on May 4 that was canceled after community outcry.

Adam Berman, executive director of the Berkeley farm and education center, disclosed the news in an email to J. this week.

The chickens, which were no longer laying eggs, were killed by a shochet (kosher slaughterer) in two sessions attended by staff members and Urban Adamah fellows. Eight chickens were slaughtered on May 14 and the remainder on May 20.

“Unfortunately, we were unable, due to time limitations, to process all of the chickens on [May 14],” Berman wrote in an email. “The remaining few were killed by staff, with the support of our fellows, on Tuesday afternoon, May 20 All of our chickens were treated with utmost kindness and care during their lifetimes and killed in the most thoughtful and humane way we know possible.”

The meat was used in chicken soup and served at Urban Adamah’s weekly free farm stand on May 21. The stand usually gives away produce grown on the Berkeley farm.

“The farm stand is designed for people who don’t have access to healthful food,” Berman said.

The shechting happened around the time Jewish Vegetarians of North America and United Poultry Concerns launched an online petition calling on Urban Adamah to “release the 15 healthy young hens.” Several weeks ago, those groups helped mount a campaign to cancel the May 4 workshop, threatening to protest at the event.

Karen Davis, president of United Poultry Concerns, wrote in an email that the slaughter “casts an ugly light on Urban Adamah.”

“They may never again use the words compassion, respect, gratitude and reverence for these birds — or any other animal they intend to destroy needlessly — without feeling their stomachs curdle with revulsion and shame that they could so meanly hurt and kill innocent creatures at their mercy,” she wrote.

The first kosher slaughter session was led by shochet and Jewish educator Rabbi Zac Johnson.

Seth Harris, a former Urban Adamah fellow, wrote in an email, “It was a beautiful ceremony and I am extremely grateful to have been present for it. My deepest thinking and feeling these days has been focused on my relationship to animals.”

Melissa Ament, part of the Urban Adamah fellowship program, said she had a similar reaction. The 23-year-old Deerfield, Ill., native and recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin thought she might be uncomfortable watching chickens being slaughtered for the first time, but she wasn’t.

“I’ve always eaten meat, and for anyone who is going to eat meat, I think that they should know where it comes from and have the opportunity to see the process,” she said. “To go through that makes me realize how much work goes into the food we eat.”

Before the slaughter, Johnson said a prayer and then attendees sat silently in a circle while the chickens had their necks slit. Ament said participants plucked the chickens’ feathers while the bodies were still warm.

“It was more like a peaceful process, which I didn’t expect,” Ament said.

Jeffrey Cohan, executive director of JVNA, said, “We’re disappointed that Urban Adamah did not avail itself of the opportunity to spare the hens and transfer them at no cost to a farm animal sanctuary.”

According to JVNA and UPC, three nearby sanctuaries had offered to adopt the hens.

“Please note, we didn’t cancel the original workshop because we agreed with the protesters,” Berman noted. “We cancelled the workshop because our landlord asked us not to hold a public workshop and because we didn’t think we could hold a safe and respectful event with protesters near the farm.”

Berman continued: “Food brings up so many different real world feelings, questions and opinions. That’s a big reason why, as an organization, we focus on food as a gateway to larger ethical and spiritual issues. Whether or not to eat meat is one of those issues with many legitimate points of view. Most of the people in our community eat meat. Our opinion is that if you are going to eat meat, you ought to know as much as possible about where that meat comes from and how it gets to your plate.

“I also want to share that since this became a public conversation, I have heard from over 1,000 people protesting our choice/policy. Literally, only one of them, as far as we can tell, has actually participated in any of our programs on the farm. Except for this individual, all the protesters are people outside of the community of folks who call Urban Adamah home. Separately, we’ve received hundreds of emails and phone calls from our community members — former fellows, parents of campers and our after school program, participants in our holiday celebration, and leaders from Jewish and social justice organizations in the community — all who have voiced support for our policy.”

This article first appeared on J. Weekly. Follow Andy Altman-Ohr on twitter @andytheohr.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: kosher slaughter, urban adamah

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • Will Americans who served in the Israeli army during the Gaza operation face war crimes charges when they get back home?
  • Talk about a fashion faux pas. What was Zara thinking with the concentration camp look?
  • “The Black community was resistant to the Jewish community coming into the neighborhood — at first.” Watch this video about how a group of gardeners is rebuilding trust between African-Americans and Jews in Detroit.
  • "I am a Jewish woman married to a non-Jewish man who was raised Catholic, but now considers himself a “common-law Jew.” We are raising our two young children as Jews. My husband's parents are still semi-practicing Catholics. When we go over to either of their homes, they bow their heads, often hold hands, and say grace before meals. This is an especially awkward time for me, as I'm uncomfortable participating in a non-Jewish religious ritual, but don't want his family to think I'm ungrateful. It's becoming especially vexing to me now that my oldest son is 7. What's the best way to handle this situation?" http://jd.fo/b4ucX What would you do?
  • Maybe he was trying to give her a "schtickle of fluoride"...
  • It's all fun, fun, fun, until her dad takes the T-Bird away for Shabbos.
  • "Like many Jewish people around the world, I observed Shabbat this weekend. I didn’t light candles or recite Hebrew prayers; I didn’t eat challah or matzoh ball soup or brisket. I spent my Shabbat marching for justice for Eric Garner of Staten Island, Michael Brown of Ferguson, and all victims of police brutality."
  • Happy #NationalDogDay! To celebrate, here's a little something from our archives:
  • A Jewish couple was attacked on Monday night in New York City's Upper East Side. According to police, the attackers flew Palestinian flags.
  • "If the only thing viewers knew about the Jews was what they saw on The Simpsons they — and we — would be well served." What's your favorite Simpsons' moment?
  • "One uncle of mine said, 'I came to America after World War II and I hitchhiked.' And Robin said, 'I waited until there was a 747 and a kosher meal.'" Watch Billy Crystal's moving tribute to Robin Williams at last night's #Emmys:
  • "Americans are much more focused on the long term and on the end goal which is ending the violence, and peace. It’s a matter of zooming out rather than debating the day to day.”
  • "I feel great sorrow about the fact that you decided to return the honor and recognition that you so greatly deserve." Rivka Ben-Pazi, who got Dutchman Henk Zanoli recognized as a "Righteous Gentile," has written him an open letter.
  • Is there a right way to criticize Israel?
  • From The Daily Show to Lizzy Caplan, here's your Who's Jew guide to the 2014 #Emmys. Who are you rooting for?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.