The Jew And The Carrot

Tel Aviv's 5 Best Kosher Restaurants

By Rotem Maimon

  • Print
  • Share Share

Blue Sky, a chef restaurant featuring Meir Adoni’s cuisine. Photo by David Bachar

(Haaretz) — Diners who keep kosher have been increasingly demanding gourmet restaurants that meet their dietary requirements. The result has been a wave of excellent kosher restaurants. Following are the five best in Tel Aviv.

Blue Sky: Chef Meir Adoni’s new restaurant opened last summer, marking this creative chef’s entry into the world of kashrut. The restaurant is located at the top of the Carlton Hotel, giving it a panoramic view of the city, and it is a swallow heralding the arrival of another kosher restaurant in the spring. Blue Sky offers dairy and fish dishes served in the style of its elder sister, Catit – in other words, beautifully arranged dishes with interesting tastes.

Blue Sky, Carlton Hotel, Tel Aviv

Goshen: This well-known kosher restaurant in the Nahalat Binyamin pedestrian mall has recently expanded, opening another branch on the other side of the road. Its very name proclaims its allegiance to local raw materials, first and foremost meat. Goshen is proud of the meat locker, where it ages its own supply, and of how it is served up: on a hot skillet on which hefty portions of meat sizzle.

Goshen, Nahalat Binyamin 37, Tel Aviv

Tranquilla: This restaurant already has a handful of fans who don’t keep kosher, and rightly so, thanks to its simple Italian food made with raw materials from Italy. It also has and a foreign atmosphere that stems in part from its location between the Gan Hahashmal quarter and Rothschild Boulevard. Aside from its excellent breakfasts and its fresh focaccias, it also offers homemade pizzas and pastas.

Tranquilla, Mikveh Yisrael 1, Tel Aviv

Olive Leaf: This is the Sheraton Hotel’s gourmet restaurant, presided over by chef Charlie Fadida. He has created a menu marked by Mediterranean influences: It uses of the Lebanese, Syrian, Turkish and Greek cuisines, along with those of Italy, France, Spain and Morocco, all executed with precision. Add in windows that overlook the sea, and it feels like a trip abroad.

Olive Leaf – Sheraton Hotel, Hayarkon 115, Tel Aviv

Deca: It’s a bit surprising to find a quiet, attractive corner like Deca in the midst of the garages, noise and smoke that characterize Hamasger Street. The restaurant opened almost seven years ago as a fish and dairy restaurant, and over time it began drawing inspiration from the kitchens of the Mediterranean Basin. It has a superb kitchen presided over by chef Roy Cohen, and the food is fresh, local and tasty.

Deca – Hata’asiya 10, Tel Aviv

For more stories, go to Haaretz.com or to subscribe to Haaretz, click here and use the following promotional code for Forward readers: FWD13.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: kosher israel, kosher restaurants, kosher tel aviv

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • "Let’s not fall into the simplistic us/them dichotomy of 'we were just minding our business when they started firing rockets at us.' We were not just minding our business. We were building settlements, manning checkpoints, and filling jails." What do you think?
  • PHOTOS: 10,000 Israel supporters gathered for a solidarity rally near the United Nations in New York yesterday.
  • Step into the Iron Dome with Tuvia Tenenbom.
  • What do you think of Wonder Woman's new look?
  • "She said that Ruven Barkan, a Conservative rabbi, came into her classroom, closed the door and turned out the lights. He asked the class of fourth graders to lie on the floor and relax their bodies. Then, he asked them to pray for abused children." Read Paul Berger's compelling story about a #Savannah community in turmoil:
  • “Everything around me turns orange, then a second of silence, then a bomb goes off!" First installment of Walid Abuzaid’s account of the war in #Gaza:
  • Is boredom un-Jewish?
  • Let's face it: there's really only one Katz's Delicatessen.
  • "Dear Diaspora Jews, I’m sorry to break it to you, but you can’t have it both ways. You can’t insist that every Jew is intrinsically part of the Israeli state and that Jews are also intrinsically separate from, and therefore not responsible for, the actions of the Israeli state." Do you agree?
  • Are Michelangelo's paintings anti-Semitic? Meet the Jews of the Sistine Chapel: http://jd.fo/i4UDl
  • What does the Israel-Hamas war look like through Haredi eyes?
  • Was Israel really shocked to find there are networks of tunnels under Gaza?
  • “Going to Berlin, I had a sense of something waiting there for me. I was searching for something and felt I could unlock it by walking the streets where my grandfather walked and where my father grew up.”
  • How can 3 contradictory theories of Yiddish co-exist? Share this with Yiddish lovers!
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.