The Jew And The Carrot

Cronut Craze Invades the Holy Land

By Tal Trachtman Alroy

  • Print
  • Share Share
Tal Trachtman

In New York Dominque Ansel’s cronut (a donut croissant hybrid) is the talk of the town. Devoted pastry lovers and the slightly insane line up outside the bakery as early as 5 or 6am daily to buy their daily allowance of two cronuts a person for $5 each. Those wishing to avoid the crowds are rumored to have spent up to $40 buying off scalpers nearby. The trend has spawned knock offs as close by as Washington DC and as far as South Korea.

Now, Tel Avivians are getting in on the action as well. Lenchner bakery made local headlines last week with the first kosher iteration of the craze. But, in a matter of days, they were no longer the only bakery cashing in on the frenzy in the Holy Land. The bakery of northern Tel Aviv’s popular Movieng Cafe (where you can rent movies and pick up your favorite pastries regularly), is also cashing in on the buttery obsession. I went to test out these versions and see if these half-doughnut, half-croissant buttery bad boys are worth the hype.

In case you’re in need of additional calories, Dominique Ansel’s original Cronuts are rolled in sugar, fried, filled with cream and topped with glaze. The Lenchner’s have left out the additional delight of cream filling and offer the glazed version only. For just 10 shekel’s a pop ($2.80), four varieties of Cronuts awaited Israelis with a sweet tooth this past Friday: vanilla glazed, chocolate glazed and white or milk chocolate glaze topped with almonds.

Tal Trachtman

“Only two people in the Middle East know this recipe,” Alon Lenchner, who works with his father Shmulik at the family-run bakery. “My father and myself.” Asked whether he or his father ever tasted one of the few hundred crispy pastries produced daily in New York City before copying it here in Israel, Lenchner shyly says they have never had the honor. “We just heard about the invention and the hype and knew we could do it too. It’s really very simple,” he says, hinting that this is no new discovery or special patent for the 65 year old bakery.

While this was most definitely a sweet-tooth filling sensation, we’re not sure impatient and weight-conscious Tel Avivians will be circling the blocks of Shenkin or Herzl any time soon (there was no line on Friday), just to get a bite of the Kosher Cronut.

Although the Lenchner’s are unique in their kosher approval, Movieing Bakery has come out with a variation that may better suit the Israeli palette. Owner Meni Lebovitch says the bakery aimed to “Israelify” the pastry by skipping the frying stage of preparation. Movieing offers healthier baked cronuts filled with crème, taste just as amazing (if not better), are a tad more guilt-free and even come in a salty, non-kosher version stuffed with ham and emmental cheese. The sweet Cronut at Movieing goes for 11 NIS while the salty Cronut can be yours for 14.

A small reminder of the last time doughnuts tried to take over the local market (aside from Hanukah) was in 1996 when Dunkin Donuts opened its doors in major Israeli cities only to endure major losses and ultimately full closure of the chain in 2001. But Israelis have a knack for successfully copying American pastry trends, aka, the cupcake craze that spread across Tel Aviv’s bakeries in 2010 and is still keeping its head above water. Only time will tell if Israeli pastry makers will be able to instill the same passion in Israelis for the donut-croissant hybrid as Ansel has managed to do on the Island of Manhattan.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: movieng cafe, lenchner bakery, dominique ansel, cronuts in Israel, Kosher cronut

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • What do you think of Wonder Woman's new look?
  • "She said that Ruven Barkan, a Conservative rabbi, came into her classroom, closed the door and turned out the lights. He asked the class of fourth graders to lie on the floor and relax their bodies. Then, he asked them to pray for abused children." Read Paul Berger's compelling story about a #Savannah community in turmoil:
  • “Everything around me turns orange, then a second of silence, then a bomb goes off!" First installment of Walid Abuzaid’s account of the war in #Gaza:
  • Is boredom un-Jewish?
  • Let's face it: there's really only one Katz's Delicatessen.
  • "Dear Diaspora Jews, I’m sorry to break it to you, but you can’t have it both ways. You can’t insist that every Jew is intrinsically part of the Israeli state and that Jews are also intrinsically separate from, and therefore not responsible for, the actions of the Israeli state." Do you agree?
  • Are Michelangelo's paintings anti-Semitic? Meet the Jews of the Sistine Chapel: http://jd.fo/i4UDl
  • What does the Israel-Hamas war look like through Haredi eyes?
  • Was Israel really shocked to find there are networks of tunnels under Gaza?
  • “Going to Berlin, I had a sense of something waiting there for me. I was searching for something and felt I could unlock it by walking the streets where my grandfather walked and where my father grew up.”
  • How can 3 contradictory theories of Yiddish co-exist? Share this with Yiddish lovers!
  • "We must answer truthfully: Has a drop of all this bloodshed really helped bring us to a better place?”
  • "There are two roads. We have repeatedly taken the one more traveled, and that has made all the difference." Dahlia Scheindlin looks at the roots of Israel's conflict with Gaza.
  • Shalom, Cooperstown! Cooperstown Jewish mayor Jeff Katz and Jeff Idelson, director of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, work together to oversee induction weekend.
  • A boost for morale, if not morals.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.