The Jew And The Carrot

Hot Chocolate for Cold Sukkot Nights

By Debbie Prinz

  • Print
  • Share Share
wikicommons

This year make room for chocolate in your Sukkot celebration. Sukkot’s theme of openness symbolized by the leafy ceiling and flimsy walls tempts creative approaches to menus, decorations, and customs. Deuteronomy 16:14’s challenge “v’samachta b’chagecha” (to rejoice in the festival) could easily be fulfilled by layering chocolate onto the holiday’s menus. Sukkot’s custom of welcoming honored guests, known as ushpizin, (traditionally Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, David; additionally more recently, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, Leah, Miriam, Abigail, Esther) into the Sukkah. What better way to honor a guest than to treat them to tantalizing chocolate concoctions.

It could also be fun to recall some of the earlier Jews with significant connections to chocolate by extending a symbolic Sukkah invitation of ushpizin to colonial American traders, retailers and manufacturers such as Aaron Lopez, Rebecca Gomez and Daniel Gomez. From the first of the Jewish chocolate makers ever, in Bayonne, France, include Abraham D’Andrade. Cite Jews who developed the navigational sciences of the 15th-16th centuries which in turn created the opportunity for European first contact with cocoa beans, such as Abraham Ben Samuel Zacuto.

Imagine dried cocoa pods, cocoa beans and other chocolatey decorations hanging from your sukkah or enhancing your festive table. Begin the celebration with a traditional round challah totally doused in chocolate, or a round raisin challah shmeared with chocolate spread, or a round challah encrusted with chocolate chips. On the second night, the salads could be decorated with healthy and crunchy cocoa nibs. For the third night one of the courses could tempt with fresh fruits such as apples, pear and more dipped into chocolate fondue. The fourth night’s main course–chicken, fish or meat–could be smothered in a chocolate mole sauce. Any Sukkot meal could end with a dessert platter of gooey possibilities, perhaps highlighted by delicious truffles and chocolate covered candied apples, their roundness recalling the cycle of the year. Warm up in the cool of the fall evenings with a Mexican style hot chocolate or a rich Italian bicerin lusciously layered with coffee, chocolate and cream. The last night could spotlight chocolate in each course.

Ultimately, whichever recipe, chocolate course, or brand of chocolate you choose to mix in with the first fruits for Sukkot, be sure to blend in the tradition of Sukkot’s themes of appreciation and gratitude by reciting a special shehakol b’racha for the amazing gift of chocolate Enjoy the bounty of the abundant blessings, including chocolate, and a Chag Sameach!

Recipe for Bicerin

3⁄4 cup whole milk or cream
3 ounces dark chocolate, finely chopped or shaved
1 cup espresso or very strong coffee
Lightly sweetened whipped cream, flavored with vanilla or cinnamon
(or both, to taste)

1) Heat the milk or cream slowly over low heat in a double boiler, stirring frequently, until steaming; be careful not to scorch it. Add the chopped chocolate to the steaming milk. Stir slowly over low heat, not allowing the mixture to boil. Remove from the heat.

2 )Pour 1⁄4 cup of the warm chocolate into each of four heatproof glasses. Using the bottom of a tablespoon held against the side of the glass to create a separate layer, pour 1⁄4 cup of espresso into each glass.

3) Again using a tablespoon, pour an equal layer of whipped cream over the top of each drink. The cream should be hand-whipped to a consistency just thick enough to float on top of the drink.

Quantity: 4 servings

You may contact Rabbi Prinz at debbierprinz@gmail.com. She maintains a blog at Jews on the Chocolate Trail.

The bicerin recipe is from “On the Chocolate Trail: A Delicious Adventure Connecting Jews, Religions, History, Travel, Rituals and Recipes to the Magic of Cacao,” 2012 Deborah R. Prinz (Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing). $18.99 + $3.95 s/h. Order by mail or call 800-962-4544 or on-line at www.jewishlights.com. Permission granted by Jewish Lights Publishing, P.O. Box 237, Woodstock, VT 05091.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: sukkot, chocolate, bicern

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • Sigal Samuel's family amulet isn't just rumored to have magical powers. It's also a symbol of how Jewish and Indian rituals became intertwined over the centuries. http://jd.fo/a3BvD Only three days left to submit! Tell us the story of your family's Jewish heirloom.
  • British Jews are having their 'Open Hillel' moment. Do you think Israel advocacy on campus runs the risk of excluding some Jewish students?
  • "What I didn’t realize before my trip was that I would leave Uganda with a powerful mandate on my shoulders — almost as if I had personally left Egypt."
  • Is it better to have a young, fresh rabbi, or a rabbi who stays with the same congregation for a long time? What do you think?
  • Why does the leader of Israel's social protest movement now work in a beauty parlor instead of the Knesset?
  • What's it like to be Chagall's granddaughter?
  • Is pot kosher for Passover. The rabbis say no, especially for Ashkenazi Jews. And it doesn't matter if its the unofficial Pot Day of April 20.
  • A Ukrainian rabbi says he thinks the leaflets ordering Jews in restive Donetsk to 'register' were a hoax. But the disturbing story still won't die.
  • Some snacks to help you get through the second half of Passover.
  • You wouldn't think that a Soviet-Jewish immigrant would find much in common with Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But the famed novelist once helped one man find his first love. http://jd.fo/f3JiS
  • Can you relate?
  • The Forverts' "Bintel Brief" advice column ran for more than 65 years. Now it's getting a second life — as a cartoon.
  • Half of this Hillel's members believe Jesus was the Messiah.
  • Vinyl isn't just for hipsters and hippies. Israeli photographer Eilan Paz documents the most astonishing record collections from around the world:http://jd.fo/g3IyM
  • Could Spider-Man be Jewish? Andrew Garfield thinks so.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.