The Jew And The Carrot

Eat More on Yom Kippur?

By Elizabeth Traison

  • Print
  • Share Share
Elizabeth Traison

For the most part, Jews celebrate good things with lots of food. Holidays like Rosh Hashanah and Passover bring to mind full bellies and bubbie’s matzo ball soup, perhaps even more than the feelings of repentance and liberation they are supposed to invoke. On the other hand, to commemorate sad events, we fast. The temple was destroyed on Tisha B’Av, and an assassination marked the end of Jewish autonomy in Jerusalem (Tzom Gedaliah) and on these days, we refrain from eating to better concentrate on the solemnness of the day.

But Yom Kippur, the holiest of the Jewish holidays, breaks the mold: On Yom Kippur we’re supposed to not eat and be happy about it. The haftarah traditionally read on Yom Kippur makes this explicitly clear. Referring to the ancient Jews wearing sackcloth and ashes, the prophet Isaiah says in the name of God, “Do you call that a fast?” I imagine the end of the sentence must have gone “I’ll show YOU a fast!” as white linen-clad Isaiah dances an over-the-top dance to demonstrate his glee in front of a roomful of Jews in sackcloth and misery.

Thus, the point of Yom Kippur is not fasting. Refraining from eating and drinking is but one of a number of prohibitions, including not wearing leather or taking a shower. Of course, we seem to have less of a problem wearing Converse to shul than we do not eating for a day. On this holiest of days, we are supposed to be focusing on the fact that we are free from sin (to sound anything short of an evangelical) and that our fate has been sealed in the Book of Life, not on our empty stomachs. I have experienced this but twice in my life, on the two Yom Kippurim that I spent in Israel — where the whole country agrees change the clocks so that the fast will be over at 5:00 PM. But in Detroit, where I have spent every other Yom Kippur of my life, the Fast typically ends after 8:00 PM, a time when even kichel looks appetizing.

The Rabbis, knowing that they were probably going to face backlash even to this most important and holy of commandments, came up with a gratifying caveat to the laws of Yom Kippur. This is the lesser-known mitzvah of eating all day the day before Yom Kippur (9 Tishrei). The Rabbis say that eating on the day before Yom Kippur counts as if one fasted on both the 9 and 10 of Tishrei (the Hebrew dates of the holiday). One early 20th century Rabbi, known as the Chaffetz Chayyim, is said to have carried lollipops around with him all day to ensure that his mouth was never empty. The early rabbis plan is quite brilliant; how else do you break the news to an entire nation of food-lovers that they have to stop eating for a full day and be happy about it? You tell them to eat non-stop the day before!

Of course, the key to having a spiritually uplifting Yom Kippur is one where we are both physically and spiritually satisfied. Somewhere in between starving and gorging lies the key to a meaningful holiday. Eating normal-sized meals that are high in protein are a helpful trick. In addition, over-hydrating can be just as unhelpful as over-eating. Make sure to drink enough water, but don’t fill up too much. Eat slowly, and enjoy the final meal before 25-hours of serious spiritual investigation (or, you might call it, digestion?).

With this in mind, have an easy and meaningful fast, and a beautiful new year.

Liz Traison is a recent graduate of The University of Michigan where she received a BA in History and Judaic Studies. She also studied at Midreshet Lindenbaum and Hebrew University. She is thrilled to be the newest Program Fellow at Hazon and can’t wait for the Food Conference. She likes being outside, particularly on Skeleton Lake. And also being inside, particularly doing creative workshops in prison.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Yom Kippur, Mitzvah, Fast Day

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • “You can plagiarize the Bible, can’t you?” Jill Sobule says when asked how she went about writing the lyrics for a new 'Yentl' adaptation. “A couple of the songs I completely stole." Share this with the theater-lovers in your life!
  • Will Americans who served in the Israeli army during the Gaza operation face war crimes charges when they get back home?
  • Talk about a fashion faux pas. What was Zara thinking with the concentration camp look?
  • “The Black community was resistant to the Jewish community coming into the neighborhood — at first.” Watch this video about how a group of gardeners is rebuilding trust between African-Americans and Jews in Detroit.
  • "I am a Jewish woman married to a non-Jewish man who was raised Catholic, but now considers himself a “common-law Jew.” We are raising our two young children as Jews. My husband's parents are still semi-practicing Catholics. When we go over to either of their homes, they bow their heads, often hold hands, and say grace before meals. This is an especially awkward time for me, as I'm uncomfortable participating in a non-Jewish religious ritual, but don't want his family to think I'm ungrateful. It's becoming especially vexing to me now that my oldest son is 7. What's the best way to handle this situation?" http://jd.fo/b4ucX What would you do?
  • Maybe he was trying to give her a "schtickle of fluoride"...
  • It's all fun, fun, fun, until her dad takes the T-Bird away for Shabbos.
  • "Like many Jewish people around the world, I observed Shabbat this weekend. I didn’t light candles or recite Hebrew prayers; I didn’t eat challah or matzoh ball soup or brisket. I spent my Shabbat marching for justice for Eric Garner of Staten Island, Michael Brown of Ferguson, and all victims of police brutality."
  • Happy #NationalDogDay! To celebrate, here's a little something from our archives:
  • A Jewish couple was attacked on Monday night in New York City's Upper East Side. According to police, the attackers flew Palestinian flags.
  • "If the only thing viewers knew about the Jews was what they saw on The Simpsons they — and we — would be well served." What's your favorite Simpsons' moment?
  • "One uncle of mine said, 'I came to America after World War II and I hitchhiked.' And Robin said, 'I waited until there was a 747 and a kosher meal.'" Watch Billy Crystal's moving tribute to Robin Williams at last night's #Emmys:
  • "Americans are much more focused on the long term and on the end goal which is ending the violence, and peace. It’s a matter of zooming out rather than debating the day to day.”
  • "I feel great sorrow about the fact that you decided to return the honor and recognition that you so greatly deserve." Rivka Ben-Pazi, who got Dutchman Henk Zanoli recognized as a "Righteous Gentile," has written him an open letter.
  • Is there a right way to criticize Israel?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.