The Arty Semite

William Shatner Reads 'Where the Wild Things Are'

By Forward Staff

Are the Wild Things, from Maurice Sendak’s, “Where the Wild Things Are,” actually living somewhere in the Star Trek universe? Well, there’s no real evidence of any intersection between Sendak’s imaginary world and that of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry. But worlds could still collide at the recent Denver Comic Con, where William Shatner, who played Star Trek’s Captain Kirk, read Sendak’s book to a group of young readers.

“But remember, here’s the whole idea,” Shatner told his audience. “Mysterious questions, the mystery of the world — nobody knows the answers to a lot of it. And so it’s all in your imagination.”

Well, in my imagination, maybe the Wild Things actually live somewhere in the Gamma Quadrant.

Watch William Shatner read ‘Where the Wild Things Are’:

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Howard Stern To Get a Comic Book

By Gary Shapiro

Fresh from being attacked by comedian Andy Dick as a “shallow, money-grubbing Jew,” with a “big fat hook nose,” Howard Stern has a new way to be his provocative heebie self. The shaggy-haired star has his own comic book that gives him new opportunities to mouth off.

The “Howard Stern” title is part of a line of comics aimed for the 18- to 35-year-old male market, said Darren G. Davis, president of Bluewater Productions, Inc.

Larry “Ratso” Sloman, who worked with Stern on his books “Private Parts” and “Miss America” is not surprised by the interest in Stern. He told The Arty Semite that Stern is popular because he has the courage to say what others won’t. “Beneath that image,” Sloman continued, “Howard is probably the hardest working guy I’ve ever met.”

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Out and About: Chaim Soutine in New York; 'Weiner!' the Musical

By Ezra Glinter

Chaim Soutine, ‘The Beef,’ 1920
  • How the daughter of an American diplomat had the time of her life in Nazi Berlin.

  • A new exhibit in New York brings the spotlight back to the life-filled paintings of Chaim Soutine.

  • A fight has broken out over the Anne Frank tree.

  • Ben Greenman gives us Weiner!, the musical.

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Out and About: Iran beats Israeli Chess Record; Thorstein Veblen on Jewish Intellectualism

By Ezra Glinter

Detail from a mural by Maurice Sendak, now at the Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia.

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Esperanto, the 'Worldwide Yiddish'

By Gary Shapiro

Wiki Commons
Ludwig Lazarus Zamenhof, inventor of Esperanto.

What do fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien, Yugoslavian dictator Josip Broz Tito, Brazilian soccer star Pelé and financier George Soros have in common? They all share an interest in Esperanto, an invented language whose goal is to unite humankind.

“Nekredebla,” you might be thinking (that’s Esperanto for “incredible”). But not so quick — other well known figures have also supported the language, including Leo Tolstoy, the grand old man of European letters.

On December 15 some 70 Esperanto enthusiasts descended on a building near the United Nations for the Universal Esperanto Association’s Zamenhof Symposium 2010. The meeting drew people from a wide range of ages, religions and backgrounds. Human rights lawyer Ugoji Eze, born of a Jewish mother and Nigerian father and a member of Young Israel of West Hempstead, was not an atypical participant.

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