The Arty Semite

Palestine's Tragic Oscar Hopeful Tests Identity

By Dan Williams

(Reuters) — The complexities and contradictions of the Middle East conflict come into play in both the real-life production story and fictional plot of “Omar,” Palestine’s contender for a best foreign language film Oscar.

The movie’s director and lead actors are Israeli Arabs who identify as Palestinian. And while it depicts lovers literally walled-off by Israel’s West Bank barrier, and a hero brutalized by Israeli secret police, the $2 million drama was filmed mostly in Nazareth, northern Israel, without hindrance.

“Whatever we wanted, we could shoot. And this is a great attitude. I think they (Israeli authorities) were smart to do that, because every journalist will ask me, ‘How was your shoot?’ and I have no stories to tell,” writer-director Hany Abu-Assad said in a telephone interview.

Such a conciliatory spirit is absent from “Omar,” however — as elusive as actual Palestinian statehood in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, which world powers hope will emerge from peace talks with Israel.

The film looks at the grind of life under Israeli military occupation: A young Palestinian lethally lashes out at the army and is punished with pressure to spy on his own side or end up in prison with no prospects of marrying the woman he loves.

Betrayal, and the mistaken perception of betrayal, follow, with bleak and bloody consequences — a plot which Abu-Assad says was inspired by Shakespeare’s tragedy “Othello.”

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Palestinian Film 'Omar' Nominated for an Oscar

By Jana Banin

(JTA) — The Palestinian film ‘Omar,” directed by Hany Abu-Assad, has just been nominated for an Academy Award in the Foreign Language Film category.

It’s the second nomination for Abu-Assad, whose “Paradise Now” was up for the prize in 2005. It’s also the second time a Palestinian film has been nominated, according to Haaretz.

“Omar,” shot in Nazareth and the West Bank, is a romantic thriller about a baker arrested and beaten by Israeli intelligence agents following the murder of an Israeli soldier. He is then forced to become a double agent for Israeli intelligence.

Nazareth-born Abu-Assad has Israeli citizenship but identifies as a Palestinian, The Times of Israel reports. Apparently the film itself has a similar slippery identity. Local media has questioned whether it should be labeled a Palestinian film, as it was filmed in the Israeli town of Nazareth and features several Israeli Arab actors. Abu-Assad, who made the film with an entirely Palestinian crew and had mostly Palestinian funding, says there’s no debating the fact that it is an entirely Palestinian film.

“Omar” earned the Jury Prize at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

See the trailer here:

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Israel at the Oscars

By Isaac Zablocki

At this year’s Academy Awards, Israel’s blossoming film industry has two nominations for the Best Documentary Award. In this highly competitive category, Israel is dominating with “The Gatekeepers,” following former chiefs of the Shin Bet, Israel’s secret service operators, who give a tell-all expose of some of the most notorious operations in the West Bank and Gaza. “5 Broken Cameras,” released in the U.S. earlier this year by Kino-Lorber, follows a Palestinian man documenting the peaceful resistance of his Arab village in the West Bank (protesting illegal expansions of territories and land confiscation), and the not so peaceful reactions of the Israeli military.

Both films stylistically could not be more different. “The Gatekeepers” is made with ground breaking animated effects, while “5 Broken Cameras” is more of a gritty found-footage film, edited together to create a story from the guerilla images. But both films bring a critical perspective of Israel with hope to create change in the stalemate peace process and, more importantly, to change Israeli society’s unethical elements from within.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Gatekeepers, Oscars, Film, Isaac Zablocki, Lincoln, Academy Awards, 5 Broken Cameras

Why Oscar Nominee Doesn't Represent Israel

By Ralph Seliger

Last year, in a nearly empty screening room, I saw what became an Academy Award finalist in the documentary category, “5 Broken Cameras.” I then interviewed filmmaker Guy Davidi about his background and his work on the film for The Arty Semite.

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Recently I had another email conversation with Davidi, discussing how he’s faring with his film in the limelight, the nature of his collaboration with his Palestinian co-director Emad Burnat, and whether he knew if his colleague (a novice in the trade) would pursue filmmaking in the future.

When asked his view of the other Israeli-produced film nominated for best documentary, “The Gatekeepers,” he was reluctant to say much, citing an Academy rule prohibiting him from commenting on a fellow nominee. He responded mainly about his experience as a nominee with his Palestinian partner, but began with the political impact of the other work:

”The Gatekeepers” has put an end to the claim that Ehud Barak conveyed that there is no Palestinian partner; for me [this] is the most important achievement of the film and [on] the political discourse in Israel.

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Streisand Returns to the Oscars

By Forward Staff

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Barbra Streisand will take the stage at this year’s Academy Awards on February 24, for the first time in 36 years. Streisand, 70, last performed in 1977 to sing the theme song for “A Star Is Born.” She also appeared at the 75th Academy Awards, in 2003, to present Eminem with the Best Original Song award for “Lose Yourself” and she announced Kathryn Bigelow as Best Director for “The Hurt Locker” in 2010.

Streisand’s own Oscars include Best Actress for 1968’s “Funny Girl,” and Best Original Song for “A Star Is Born.” The Forward named Streisand to its Forward 50 list this past year on the heels of two sold-out shows at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center.

Streisand also appeared in the recent film “The Guilt Trip,” starring as a Jewish mother opposite Seth Rogan.

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And the Nominees Are...

By Renee Ghert-Zand

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We all know that the Oscars race has been going on for some time now, but with today’s announcement of the 2013 Academy Awards nominees, we can consider the contest official.

Two Israeli films are among the final five nominees for Best Documentary. The first, “5 Broken Cameras,” by Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi, documents the first years of Burnat’s baby against the backdrop of villagers from Bil’in in the West Bank battling against Israel’s building of the security fence. The second, “The Gatekeepers,” was directed by Dror Moreh and features interviews with six former chiefs of Israel’s Shin Bet security service, who until this film had been secretive about their and their agency’s work.

Steve Spielberg’s “Lincoln” leads the Oscar race with a total of 12 nominations, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay (by Tony Kushner) and Best Director for Spielberg himself.

Veteran actor Alan Arkin got a nod for his supporting role in Ben Affleck’s “Argo,” about the stealth rescue of a group of American embassy workers during the Iranian hostage crisis.

The inclusion of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” among the nominees for Best Picture must be hugely exciting for its young production team of Dan Janvey, Josh Penn and Michael Gottwald.

The 85th annual Academy Awards ceremony will take place February 24, and will be hosted by Seth MacFarlane, who was surprised to be nominated for Best Original Song. He wrote the song “Everybody Needs a Best Friend” for the comedy film “Ted.”

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Oscar Winning Composer Inspired by Silent Film

By Ben Shalev

Crossposted from Haaretz

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Three days before he won an Oscar for the soundtrack he composed for the movie “The Artist,” Ludovic Bource sat in his studio in Paris and adapted one of the film’s songs for the accordion — the first instrument he played as a child.

Speaking before the Oscar ceremony last Sunday, the 41-year-old composer said: “I don’t know what will happen on Sunday, and how all our lives will look afterward, so I’m trying to do as much work as possible before then.”

“I’m not nervous, but I’m very excited,” Bource added. “I don’t know whether I have a chance to win, but just being nominated is a great honor for me, just to be mentioned in the same breath as terrific composers like John Williams, Howard Shore, and Alberto Iglesias.” But after winning a Golden Globe and a BAFTA, a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award, in the soundtrack category, and given the tremendous momentum of “The Artist,” Bource was all but a surefire winner.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Consolation for 'Footnote'

By Nirit Anderman

Crossposted from Haaretz

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“At this time many Iranians all over the world are watching us and I imagine them to be very happy,” Iranian director Asghar Farhadi said in his acceptance speech for his film, “A Separation,” winner of the Oscar for best foreign language film at Sunday night’s Academy Awards ceremony. “They are happy not just because of an important award or a film or a filmmaker, but because at the time when talk of war, intimidation and aggression is exchanged between politicians, the name of their country, Iran, is spoken here through her glorious culture; a rich and ancient culture that has been under heavy dust of politics,” said Farhadi. “I proudly offer this honor to the people of my country, a people who respect all cultures and civilizations and despise hostility and resentment.”

The makers of “Footnote,” the Israeli nominee which competed against “A Separation,” sat in the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood listening to the Iranian director’s speech. “It was pretty much expected,” said one of the film’s producers, David Mandil, after the ceremony. “The Iranian film won in Berlin, won the Golden Globe and the Independent Spirit, and already had a high profile, and therefore its win was fairly predictable. Still, for us, just getting to this point is a great accomplishment,” said the co-producer of “Footnote,” a saga about a father and son, who are both Talmudic scholars.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Oscar Wins for ‘The Artist’; ‘Footnote’ Shut Out

By Ezra Glinter

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Jean Dujardin accepts the best actor award for ‘The Artist.’

The French film “The Artist” was the big winner at this year’s Academy Awards, while the Israeli contender, “Footnote,” went home empty handed.

“The Artist,” by French filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius, picked up both best picture and best director honors February 26 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood.

Check out all the best Oscar night photos.

The black and white movie about the transition from silent films to talkies also picked up the best actor award for Jean Dujardin, costume design for Mark Bridges and original score for composer Ludovic Bource. In total, the film won five of the 10 Oscars for which it was nominated.

Read The Shmooze’s dish on Oscars red carpet drama

Meanwhile, Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo” received the lions share of the evening’s technical awards, including cinematography, sound editing, sound mixing and visual effects.

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Allen, Spielberg Pick Up Oscar Nods

By Forward Staff

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The 2012 Oscar nominations, announced this morning by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, included nods for Woody Allen, Steven Spielberg, and both Israeli and Polish films.

Allen continued his string of recent successes with three nominations for “Midnight in Paris,” which was shortlisted in the Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay categories. The film already won the Golden Globe award for Best Screenplay, and has picked up critical plaudits and commercial success since its June release.

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No More Holocaust Movies at the Oscars?

By Nathan Burstein

Oscar nominations won’t be announced for another month, but at least one prediction can already be made with confidence: no Holocaust films will be among this year’s major contenders.

Weinstein Company
Kate Winslet in ‘The Reader’

That’s both a relief and something of a surprise, given the ubiquity of the genre at recent Oscar ceremonies. Holocaust movies haven’t yielded too many actual winners in recent years — Kate Winslet claimed one for “The Reader,” and Christoph Waltz another for “Inglourious Basterds” — but the number of movies was itself sufficient to garner attention, a popularity that could occasionally be uncomfortable.

Awards and nominations for the movies have become so common, in fact, that it’s conventional wisdom to see the films as Oscar bait — a point that’s been made resentfully by Spike Lee and satirized elsewhere by Ricky Gervais. (In Gervais’s case it was with the help of Winslet, which made it seem all the more grubby when she won her first Academy Award for exactly that sort of movie.)

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Ratner and Murphy Step Down From Oscars

By Renee Ghert-Zand

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There are plenty of changes in the works for the 2012 Academy Awards ceremony now that both its producer and host have stepped down amid controversy.

Producer Brett Ratner (whose latest film, “Tower Heist,” is currently out in theaters) announced yesterday that he would step down from the Oscars following insensitive remarks he made about gay people and his own (heterosexual) sex life. In particular, he issued an apology related to his comment that “rehearsals are for fags.” In a letter to colleagues, he wrote:

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'Footnote' to Represent Israel at the Oscars

By Nathan Burstein

‘Footnote’ director Joseph Cedar arrives at Cannes Film Festival in May. Courtesy of Getty Images.

After sitting out the Academy Awards in February, Israel is hoping for its fourth nomination in five years with “Footnote,” a drama that combines the worlds of academia and Talmudic study.

The film won top honors tonight at the Ophirs, the Israeli equivalent of the Oscars, automatically becoming Israel’s submission in the foreign-language category at Hollywood’s Academy Awards. While Oscar nominations won’t be announced until January, “Footnote” can already be considered a front-runner, having been nominated for a Palme d’Or and taking home the best screenplay prize at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

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Out and About: Jewish Winners at the Oscars; Arguing for Modigliani

By Ezra Glinter

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  • Actress Natalie Portman and writers David Seidler and Aaron Sorkin were among the winners at last night’s Academy Awards. Also, the Israeli documentary “Strangers No More” took home the prize for best short documentary.

  • “Zenga Zenga,” An Israel video lampooning Muammar Gaddafi, has gone viral.

  • A new biography argues for the continuing relevance of Amedeo Modigliani.

  • The National Post talks to Forward contributor Michael Kaminer about “Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women.”

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Tel Aviv School No 'Stranger' to the Oscars

By Allison Kaplan Sommer

The crowded hallways of the Bialik-Rogozin school in gritty South Tel Aviv are about as far from the glitz and glamour of Hollywood as one can imagine.

Courtesy Simon & Goodman Picture Company

But on the evening of the 83rd Academy Awards on February 27, the school’s principal, Keren Tal, will make the transition from those hallways to the red carpet, as she walks alongside filmmakers Kirk Simon and Karen Goodman. Tal, along with the teachers and students of her school, are the stars of a 40-minute documentary “Strangers No More,” which is nominated for an Oscar in the Best Documentary Short category.

Bialik-Rogozin is not your typical Israeli school. On the campus, 800 children from more than 48 countries in grades K-12 are educated, many entering school with no understanding of Hebrew.

“Here, Christians, Jews and Muslims study together,” declares principal Keren Tal in the film. “In education, there are no strangers.”

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Out and About: Garry Kasparov on Bobby Fischer; Where Have All the Holocaust Movies Gone?

By Ezra Glinter

Konrad Bercovici
  • Garry Kasparov tells us what it’s like to play chess in the shadow of Bobby Fischer.

  • In a 1923 article in The Nation, “Romanian-Jewish-American-Yiddish novelist, journalist, dandy, screwball folklorist of the Gypsies” Konrad Bercovici described “The Greatest Jewish City in the World.”

  • An Israeli forger almost managed to sell a fake Kandinsky for three million Euro.

  • You have until February 27 to catch Yeshiva University’s annual Seforim Sale.

  • Sexploitation filmmaker David F. Friedman and actor Len Lesser, who played Uncle Leo on “Seinfeld,” have died.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Zorba The Greek, Yehudah Halevi, Wassily Kandinsky, Uncle Leo, The Sway Machinery, Sexploitation, Seinfeld, Paul Kletzki, Out and About, Oscars, Mikis Theodorakis, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Len Lesser, Konrad Bercovici, Joe Banowetz, Jeremiah Lockwood, Jeffrey Kahane, Hillel Halkin, Grammys, Golden Globes, Garry Kasparov, Erwin Schulhoff, David F. Friedman, Daniel Hope, Bobby Fischer, Berlin International Film Festival

Monday Music: For Uruguayan Pop Star Jorge Drexler, Jewishness Is a Connecting Force

By Sammy Loren

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The Skirball Center, a sober cultural institution on Los Angeles’s ritzy Westside, was unusually alive on January 27. Music journalists, record executives and South American diplomats with an array of Spanish accents — from Argentina to Spain to East Los Angeles — bounced about the room. Along with the requisite contingent of L.A. yentas and Hollywood types, the event brought out an eclectic crowd.

They came for Jorge Drexler. When examining the life and work of the Oscar-winning musician, it becomes clear why such a diverse audience would show up.

Born in Uruguay to a German-Jewish family, 46-year-old Drexler grew up practicing classical guitar. But like others in his family, he studied medicine, eventually becoming an otolaryngologist. Yet music still beckoned, and at the urging of Joaquin Sabina, a Madrid-based singer-songwriter, Drexler left medicine — and Montevideo — for Spain.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Skirball Center, Uruguay, The Motorcycle Diaries, Spain, Sea, Shakira, Sammy Loren, Oscars, Music, Montevideo, Mercedes Sosa, Madrid, Jorge Drexler, Lleuve, Los Angeles, Eco, Frontera, Joaquin Sabina, Amar la Trama, Bajofondo Tango Club, Al Otro Lado del Rio, Warsaw Ghetto

Out and About: Bob Dylan's Book Deal; Orthodox Dance in Israel

By Ezra Glinter

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Seinfeld Chronicles, The Human Resources Manager, Seinfeld, Out and About, Oscars, Milton Rogovin, Ka'et, Melissa Rivers, Iranium, Joan Rivers, Holy Rollers, Hasidic Rebel, Don Kirshner, Bob Dylan

Out and About: True Grit's Oscar Chances; Bullet-Stopping Books

By Ezra Glinter

  • Jewcy talks to novelist Myla Goldberg.

  • At Tablet, Leil Leibovitz eulogizes Israeli comic actor Yosef Shiloach.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Witz, True Grit, Out and About, Oscars, Myla Goldberg, Leil Leibovitz, Khan Sharonim, Joshua Cohen, Joseph Brodsky, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, Adam Kirsch, Yosef Shiloach

Israeli Documentary Shortlisted for Oscar

By Haaretz Service

Crossposted from Haaretz

Blieberg Entertainment

Israeli documentary “Precious Life” was shortlisted for the Best Documentary Film category in the 83rd Academy Awards, alongside 15 feature documentaries.

Director Shlomi Eldar’s moving film documents a saga involving a breathtaking race to save the life of a desperately ill Palestinian baby.

The baby’s militant mother, an Israeli doctor and Eldar, the Channel 10 Gaza correspondent, star in the documentary, which premiered at the Jerusalem Film Festival in July and has since been screened in documentary film festivals around the world.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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