The Arty Semite

Sigalit Landau's Bridges at the Venice Biennale

By Caroline Lagnado

‘DeadSee,’ by Sigalit Landau. Courtesy of the artist and Kamel Mennour Gallery.

While pavilions at the Venice Biennale are typically shrouded in secrecy in the months approaching one of the art world’s biggest events, the content of Israel’s pavilion this year is under especially opaque wraps. In June, Israel will be represented by 42-year-old artist Sigalit Landau, who is prone to keeping mum about her work. But in an event held last March at Sotheby’s auction house on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, Landau sat down with one of her curators, Jean de Loisy (the other is Ilan Wizgan), to speak about her concept, “One Man’s Floor Is Another Man’s Feelings.” The event was sponsored by Artis Contemporary Israeli Art Fund and by Kamel Mennour Gallery, which represents Landau in Paris.

Though the project was still in formation at the time, we can report that Landau will address the situation in the Middle East while putting it in a larger perspective; de Loisy put it as “speaking of the local, dealing with the universal.” Using water as an overarching metaphor, as well as salt and land, Landau will discuss coexistence and interdependence, reflecting on Israel’s close proximity to its neighbors. She also seemed to be interested in pre-state settlement activity.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Zeev Rechter, Yossi Berger, Venice Biennale, Sigalit Landau, One Man's Floor Is Another Man's Feelings, Miriam Cabessa, Jean de Loisy, Ilan Wizgan, Exhibits, Caroline Lagnado

Women's Liberation and Helène Aylon's 'Word of God'

By Savannah Schroll Guz

Helène Aylon, ‘Self Portrait: The Unmentionable,’ 2010

Performance and installation artist Helène Aylon scrutinizes the entrenched, sometimes invisible, belief systems that shape society. Since the 1970s, she has used her work as a tool for poetic dissent and constructive revisionism. Aylon’s early work contributed to the women’s movement, opposing the unrealistic imagery pedaled by magazines like Playboy. In the 1980s, her focus shifted to ecology and nuclear non-proliferation. By 1990, she turned her penetrating gaze to the religious texts that helped to define her female identity.

The Pentateuch, or Chumash, is the focus of Aylon’s exhibition “The Liberation of G-d and The Unmentionable,” now on view at Pittsburgh’s Andy Warhol Museum. The show is part of the Warhol’s ongoing series, “The Word of God,” which features art that addresses religion in ways intended to promote understanding between faiths. Aylon’s show follows the series’s controversial first installment, Sandow Birk’s “American Qur’an.” While controversy is also central to Aylon’s exhibition, her approach is more analytical than accusatory. Aylon acknowledges this, dedicating the show, in part, to her fifth grade Hebrew teacher and a female principal, who “encouraged Boro Park girls to question.”

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Liberation of G-d and The Unmentionable, The Digital Liberation of G-D, Savannah Schroll Guz, Playboy, Sandrow Birk, Pittsburgh, Helène Aylon, Linda Montano, Exhibits, Boro Park, Andy Warhol Museum, American Qur'an, The Word of God, Visual Art

Magic as a Jewish Family Business

By Gordon Haber

The Great Ramses Egyptian Temple of the Mysteries, 1909–1910. David Allen and Sons, Ltd., London, 1909–1910. Collection of Mike Caveney’s Egyptian Hall Museum.

Perhaps it’s time to stop being surprised by the disproportionate number of successful Jews in any random profession. That’s one of the lessons to take from “Masters of Illusion: Jewish Magicians of the Golden Age,” an entertaining exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles on view until September 4.

The exhibit runs concurrently with the Skirball Center’s showing of “Houdini: Art and Magic,” which was at The Jewish Museum in New York earlier this year. “Masters of Illusion” is intended as a complement to “Houdini,” a way of providing some context to the career of the most famous magician ever, Jewish or otherwise.

“The Golden Age” of the title refers to the time between 1875, when magic as live performance bloomed in America and Europe, and the advent of television in 1948. But the exhibit actually begins earlier, with the inclusion of an edition of Reginald Scot’s “The Discoverie of Witchcraft,” first published in the 16th century. Scot’s book argued that his witch-hunting contemporaries were mistaking prestidigitation for witchcraft. To that end, he wrote about a number of tricks that magicians use to this day.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Jewish Museum, The Discoverie of Witchcraft, Skirball Center, Masters of Illusion, Reginald Scot, Magic, Los Angeles, Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, Houdini, Horace Goldin, Gordon Haber, Exhibits, Ehrich Weiss, Charles Carter, Carter the Great, Antonio Diavalo

Picasso and the Cone Sisters

By Julie Reiss

Pablo Picasso, ‘Woman With Bangs,’ 1902. Courtesy of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Claribel and Etta Cone were born in Baltimore in 1864 and 1870, respectively. Two daughters from a large family of German Jewish immigrants, they were in many ways ahead of their time. Claribel Cone went to medical school and later became a professor at Johns Hopkins University. Neither sister ever married, and together they traveled, met artists and writers, and formed an important collection of modern art, which Etta Cone ultimately bequeathed to the Baltimore Museum of Art. A portion of this collection, along with archival material, is currently on view at The Jewish Museum in New York.

The Cone collection is most renowned for its Matisse holdings, but, as I will explain in a May 16 lecture at the museum, the two sisters were avid collectors of Picasso’s work as well. While the Picasso holdings currently on view at The Jewish Museum are modest, they rekindle interest in the points of intersection between these collectors and the artist.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Julie Reiss, John Richardson, Gertrude Stein, Exhibits, Etta Cone, Ellen Hirschland, Cone Sisters, Claribel Cone, Circus Medrano, Baltimore, Lectures, Leo Stein, The Jewish Museum

Slideshow: Departures, Experiments and 'Degenerate' Art

By Rebecca Schischa

Gert Wollheim, ‘Head of an Old Man’

Among the Nazis’ persecuted minorities were Jewish and non-Jewish artists, musicians and writers branded “degenerate” by the regime.

“Radical Departures: The Modernist Experiment,” an exhibition currently showing at the Leo Baeck Institute/Center for Jewish History in New York, gathers together work by these “degenerate” artists, including Georg Stahl, Samson Schames, David Ludwig Bloch and others.

Although compact, the exhibit presents a whistlestop tour through the major European art movements from the turn of the 20th century, taking in German Expressionism and Weimar Modernism, through to the Second World War period, and the Surrealism and Abstract art of the postwar era.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Visual Art, Rebecca Schischa, Surrealism, Second World War, Samson Schames, Nazis, Modernism, Martin Bloch, Leo Baeck Institute, Holocaust, German Expressionism, Georg Stahl, Exhibits, Degenerate Art, David Ludwig Bloch, Arthur Segal, Center for Jewish History

'Baroque Synagogues' at Prague Jewish Museum

By Samuel D. Gruber

Exhibition curator Arno Pařík in the restored synagogue in Boskovice, Moravia. Photo by Samuel Gruber.

Crossposted from Samuel Gruber’s Jewish Art & Monuments

The Jewish Museum in Prague has opened the exhibition “Barokní synagogy v českých zemích” (“Baroque synagogues in Czech Lands”) curated by Arno Pařík. The exhibtion is at the Robert Guttmann Gallery, and will be on view until August 28.

According to Dr. Pařík, “the exhibition seeks to chart in more detail than ever before a group of lesser-known monuments that uniquely reflect the history and culture of the traditional Jewish communities in this country.”

The exhibition presents a selection of the Czech Republic’s oldest synagogues, dating from the 17th and 18th centuries, with particular focus on their plans, designs and decoration. The exhibition also includes many ritual and decorative objects form the Museum collection, including a Star of David, a weather-vane, a stone alms box, a brass lavabo, and a wooden Decalogue (from Roudnice) and other items.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Samuel D. Gruber, Prague, Exhibits, Czech Republic, Architecture, Arno Pařík, Syagogues, The Jewish Museum in Prague

Reading Diaries by Einstein and Dylan

By Gary Shapiro

Beatnik William Burroughs’s dreams, English art critic John Ruskin’s chess moves, and Bob Dylan’s never-ending tour would seem to have little in common.

Albert Einstein’s journal from 1922. Courtesy of the Morgan Library and Museum.

All three, however, are chronicled in a remarkable exhibit at The Morgan Library and Museum on personal diaries. Long before there were blogs, people actually wrote their jottings in notebooks.

The exhibition in New York, titled “The Diary: Three Centuries of Private Lives,” which is open until May 22, shows just how varied such entries can be. Visitors can squint at Charlotte Bronte’s tiny letters, which are nearly impossible to read without a magnifying glass. Forget English diarist Samuel Pepys’s entries altogether: He wrote in a shorthand that resembles a kind of military code. Diaries allow the viewer to tune in (so to speak), to the thoughts and action of Arthur Sullivan (of Gilbert and Sullivan fame) on the opening night of “Pirates of Penzance.” (Spoiler: He downs 12 oysters and a glass of champagne.)

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Morgan Library and Museum, The Band, Samuel Pepys, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Journals, John Steinbeck, Henri Bergson, Gilbert and Sullivan, Exhibits, Diaries, Charlotte Bronte, Arthur Sullivan, Allen Ginsberg, Albert Einstein

Video: 'Next Year in Uman: A Journey to Ukraine'

By Ezra Glinter and Nate Lavey

Photo by Ahron D. Weiner

In 2004, photographer Ahron D. Weiner took his first trip to the gravesite of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov in Uman, Ukraine. Before his death in 1810, Nachman is said to have promised that if his followers came to his grave on Rosh Hashanah, he would intercede on their behalf in heaven, even “pulling them out of hell by their peyes.” In recent years Uman has become the largest Jewish pilgrimage site outside of Israel, drawing tens of thousands of visitors each year, a scene Weiner describes as “Mt. Sinai meets Woodstock.” For six years Weiner returned to Uman for Rosh Hashanah, taking thousands of photographs. In the video below, Weiner describes his experiences in Uman, interacting with and taking pictures of the pilgrims who flock there. An exhibit of these photos titled “Next Year in Uman: A Journey to the Ukraine” is currently on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art.

Watch a video of ‘Next Year in Uman’:

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Photography, Nachman of Breslov, Interview, Hasidim, Exhibits, Ahron D. Weiner, Rosh Hashanah, Ukraine, Uman, Video

The Ghosts of Kentridge Past

By Akin Ajayi

“Drawing for II Sole 24 Ore [World Walking],” by William Kentridge, 2007, Charcoal, gouache, pastel, and colored pencil on paper. Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, New York.

At a remove, William Kentridge’s work can seem like a study in contradictions. His work is heavily influenced by the once repressive — now merely turbulent — politics of his native South Africa, but often features a lightness sometimes bordering on whimsy; his observations have a universality of tone, yet are underpinned by a distinctly personal, at times autobiographical twist. The works themselves — collages, charcoal drawings and animations that Kentridge himself has likened to “stone-age filmmaking” — are functional in form, yet touched with an unexpected gracefulness and charm.

Showing at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem through June 18, “Five Themes” explores the last two decades of Kentridge’s prolific output in five mediums — drawing, sculpture, animation, print and stage design. Kentridge is a restless artist; the exhibition demonstrates the breadth of his artistic scope. Even so, a theme does recur, one of preoccupation with the ghosts of the past and their influence on the present.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Visual Art, Soho Eckstein, South Africa, Felix Teitlebaum, Israel Museum, Exhibits, Akin Ajayi

Ex-Haredi Artists Grapple With Their Pasts

By Shulem Deen

‘Protection’ by Leah Vincent

A photo of a woman wrapped in phylacteries might not seem very bold after Leonard Nimoy’s “Shekhina” project. But to many of the artists at the opening of a new art exhibit called “All in the Eye,” a photograph of a woman adorned with tallit and tefillin, eye to the camera with a slight smile, represents the height of sacrilege.

The woman in the photo is ex-Hasidic, as is the artist who took it. Both hail from a culture in which the act is still shocking and offensive: a woman entering a man’s domain in search of spiritual fulfillment. The portrait, of course, is powerful both for its rejection of traditional values and the re-appropriation of its ritual objects — especially given its personal context. But it’s the playful, slightly mischievous smile that is most captivating. It is as if both subject and artist, still, after many years, delight in the act of ritual subversion.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Visual Art, Shulem Deen, Leah Vincent, Leonard Nimoy, Michael Jenkins, Satmar, Shekhina, Kiryas Joel, Hadas Rivera-Weiss, Hasidic Rebel, Footsteps, Exhibits, All in the Eye

Slideshow: The Ruins of Goodash

By Renee Ghert-Zand

‘Memories 5’ by Gideon Spiegel

In 1973, during the Yom Kippur War, Gideon Spiegel, the Tel Aviv-based Israeli artist also known as Goodash, entered an abandoned Egyptian house and leafed through family photo albums that had been left there. That experience of connecting to photos of a family amid the ruins of what was once their home led to his creation of “Memories,” a series of digital collages, or “photodrawings,” which Spiegel says “use imagery that connects to ideas surrounding ancestry, collective memories, and abandoned spaces.” A selection of these works is on view at the Koch Gallery of the Schultz Cultural Arts Hall at the Oshman Family JCC in Palo Alto, Calif., until mid-June.

By blending his photographs of Christian, Muslim and Jewish buildings in Israel and the Palestinian Territories that have been abandoned since 1950 with antique photographic portraits, and then adding hand-drawn elements, Spiegel aims to evoke a bygone era, “reoccupying [the buildings] with images of former inhabitants.”

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Visual Art, Yom Kippur War, Renee Ghert-Zand, Palo Alto, Memories, Goodash, Gideon Spiegel, Exhibits, Fashion Institute of Technology

Murdered at Auschwitz, Charlotte Salomon Survives Through Her Art

By Joel Schechter

Gouache from “Life? Or Theatre?” Courtesy of the Charlotte Salomon Foundation.

Three hundred of Charlotte Salomon’s beautiful expressionist paintings illustrating a young German Jewish women’s self-discovery can be seen at San Francisco’s Contemporary Jewish Museum until July 31. The same week that the San Francisco exhibit opened, an enormous comic book convention nearby attracted thousands of young readers searching for their latest superhero (Green Lantern this year) and his predecessors. I would like to report that all the comic book readers paraded a few blocks across town to pay homage to Salomon’s landmark project, “Life? or Theatre?,” after hearing that her gouaches painted in 1942 anticipated contemporary graphic novels and the films based on them.

Regrettably few of the comic book acolytes left their convention center, as far as I know; but Salomon already has quite a following, thanks to prior exhibits of her masterwork in other cities. First brought to public attention in 1971 by the Jewish Historical Museum of Amsterdam, the series of 1,300 paintings was celebrated over a decade ago at New York’s Jewish Museum, as well as at Boston and Toronto exhibitions. (Amsterdam’s Joods Historisch Museum, repository of the collection, organized the selections in the current West Coast premiere.) By now Salomon’s work also has been well documented in scholarly books, and inspired a fine play by Elise Thoron and a volume of poems by Anne Barrows.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Life or Theater?, Joel Schechter, Green Lantern, Exhibits, Contemporary Jewish Museum, Amadeus Daberlohn, Charlotte Salomon, Charlotte Kann, Visual Art

Generations of Tradition, and Rare Books

By Katherine Clarke

From Ten copper plate etchings by Ira Moskowitz (1912-1985) for Isaac Bashevis Singer’s “Satan In Goray.”Courtesy of Cantor Bob Scherr at the Jewish Religious Center

An exhibition of rare Jewish books, now on display at the Jewish Religious Center at Williams College, Massachusetts, marks the center’s 20th anniversary. Alumnus and Jewish art collector Sigmund R. Balka loaned the books — part of his own personal Judaica collection — to the center as a means of honoring its contribution to his alma mater and passing his love of Jewish heritage on to the next generation.

Balka had a different experience from the current Jewish students at Williams: “When I began at Williams there was no Jewish center. In fact, there were very few Jewish students and certainly no place they could worship. There was compulsory chapel,” Balka, who graduated in 1956, told the Forward.

The passing of multiple new administrations since Balka’s college years has rendered the college more accepting and multi-faith, he says. Balka feels an emotional connection to the Jewish center as a symbol for Jewish students and a focal point for religious and cultural activity; “It was moving,” he remembers, “to be at the initiation of the Jewish center 20 years ago, when the prior history of the college, which was not empathetic to Jewish students, was frankly spoken about. Jewish students were able, for the first time, to have a home on campus, to be part of the student body instead of outsiders.”

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Ze'ev Raban, Williams College, Saul Raskin, Sigmund R. Balka, Satan in Goray, Robert Voltz, Katherine Clarke, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Ira Moskowitz, Exhibits, Chapin Library

The Artist's Pinch

By Dafna Arad

Crossposted from Haaretz

If you’re willing to pose with a hibiscus flower in place of a sexual organ, or have a lobster dance with you as you strike a pornographic pose — and have that photo tagged on Facebook — you have to pay for it.

Yoash Foldesh approaches a wide drawer in his house, pulls out a tin cylinder, opens it and spills puzzle pieces on a low wooden table. The pieces are large, like those of a puzzle for beginners, greenish and yellowish, and outlined in black. The task of assembling them is performed quietly, with concentration. The red lobster featured in many of Foldesh’s pieces splashes in its nearby aquarium.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Exhibits, Dafna Arad, Haaretz, Yoash Foldesh

'Close to the Sun'

By Daniel Rauchwerger

Crossposted from Haaretz

Tali Mayer

Last Friday, a day before the opening of his solo show, “NU,” at the Dvir Gallery (Hangar 2, the Jaffa port), Algerian artist Adel Abdessemed looked relatively calm. His works, which arrived last week, had been carefully and slowly unboxed and set up, one behind the other, in the large, darkened space.

One video piece, two neon graffiti and a glass installation are what he chose to exhibit here now. They are fragments: He’s not seeking to build a narrative, but rather to display “acts,” as he calls them. In the future, art critics may classify them by comfortable and clear categories, such as migration, the exploitation of women and one world catastrophe or another.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Exhibits, Dvir Gallery, Daniel Rachwerger, Abdel Abdessemed, Haaretz

Slideshow: New Moon as Meaning and Metaphor

By Renee Ghert-Zand

‘Rosh Hodesh Reflection’ by Elizheva Hurvich

“Rosh Hodesh: Beginning and Renewal,” a community art exhibition on view at the San Francisco Bureau of Jewish Education’s Jewish Community Library until July 31, begins and ends with an egg.

Curator Elayne Grossbard selected Amy Kassiola’s colorful mixed media “One Cycle of the Moon,” which depicts the egg of a woman’s menstrual cycle, as the starting point for viewing the 30 works by 27 local artists (25 women and two men), some of whom have participated in this annual show since the 1990s.

Kassiola’s piece, one of the strongest in the show, is followed by a variety of interpretations of the celebration of the New Month. Inspired by a variety of traditional and modern texts and commentaries provided by Grossbard, the artists took off in a myriad directions in terms of both message and media.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Wendie Bernstein, Visual Art, Shari Rifas, San Francisco, Rosh Hodesh, Rivka Greenberg, Renee Ghert-Zand, Passover, Nisan, Miriam, Meara McDonald, Keith Gentzler, Laynie Tzena, Mah Jongg, Elisheva Hurvich, Exhibits, Karen Benioff Friedman, Jeanette Nichols, Elayne Grossbard, Dark Radiance, Diane Bernbaum, Claire Sherman, Carol Dorf, Barbara Cymrot, Allen Shain, Amy Kassiola, Anat Hoffman Women of the Wall, B'Yadeinu, Aimee Golant

On the Kibbutz, No Straight Line to the Past

By Abby Margulies

“Do you think we told a good story?” filmmaker Sharone Lifschitz asks her mother at the end of her video installation “The Line and the Circle.” “Yes, we talked about all sorts of things,” her mother responds. “You will now have to edit it.” The installation, a short film tucked away from the main galleries in New York’s Jewish Museum, where it is showing until August 21, is a small yet sweeping film that beautifully weaves together narratives about what it means to be a child, a daughter, a kibbutznik and an Israeli — and what it means to preserve memories while also embracing and forgiving the past.

Just under 20 minutes long, “The Line and the Circle” was filmed over a two week period in 2009, and documents a conversation between Lifschitz and her aging mother. The movie follows the two as they return to the darkroom for the first time in over 20 years to develop black and white photographs taken on Kibbutz Nir Oz, where Lifschitz was born and raised. Throughout the film the camera remains fixed on the developing solution where the blank photo papers crystallize into images. Framed by a circle and a line, the development of the images is the only action seen through the camera’s unmoving lens. The photos, taken between 1959 and the early 1980s, depict day-to-day activities on the kibbutz, as well as celebrations and the occasional photo of Lifschitz and her mother. Watching the video, however, it is not the images or even one event that stands out. Rather, it is the sometimes disjointed conversation between Lifschitz and her mother that makes for the film’s narrative pull.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Sharone Lifschitz, Kibbutz Nir Oz, Film, Exhibits, Abby Margulies, The Line and the Circle

Man in the Mirror

By Smadar Sheffi

Crossposted from Haaretz

Elad Sarig
Miroslaw Balka’s “Heaven.”

“Heaven,” a work by Miroslaw Balka now showing at Hangar 2, Dvir Gallery’s space in the Jaffa Port, stirs more than a trace of irony. Sixty-eight Perspex rods, each wrought in a kind of open spiral, turn slowly, “flowing,” reminiscent of decorative objects sold at spiritual fairs or plant nurseries. In the middle of the week, when the space was entirely empty of visitors, the observer’s portrait was refracted in the rods and illuminated by an unearthly sort of light.

It is an experience in which the “I” is infinitely reduplicated, like in a hall of mirrors or in a dream. The duplication is one of solitariness, and its amplification creates an uncomfortable feeling.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Miroslaw Balka, Jaffa Port, Hangar 2, Haaretz, Exhibits, Dvir Gallery, Smadar Sheffi, Visual Art

Rappaport Prize Awarded to Artists Asaf Ben Zvi and Michael Halak

By Daniel Rauchwerger

Crossposted from Haaretz

Self portrait by Michael Halak.

The Tel Aviv Museum of Art announced the selection of painters Asaf Ben Zvi and Michael Halak as the winners of the 2011 Rappaport Prize. This is the sixth prize awarded since its establishment in 2006 in honor of Ruth and Baruch Rappaport. The prize is awarded annually to two painters, an established painter (Ben Zvi) and a young painter (Halak). Beyond the monetary sum given to the painters, the prize funds two solo exhibitions at the museum as well as the production of the catalogs accompanying the exhibitions.

The official announcement of the prize, scheduled for next Tuesday at the museum, will coincide with the opening of the exhibition by artist Sharon Poliakine and painter Oren Eliav, last year’s recipients of the prize. The exhibitions of works by Ben Zvi and Halak will open at the museum in March 2012.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Sharon Poliakine, Rappaport Prize, Prizes, Oren Eliav, Michael Halak, Haaretz, Exhibits, Asaf Ben Zvi, Daniel Rauchwerger

Q&A: Maira Kalman on the Illustrating Life

By Jillian Steinhauer

On March 11, “Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World),” the first museum exhibition devoted to New York illustrator and author Maira Kalman, opens at the Jewish Museum. The show, which debuted in Philadelphia last summer and then traveled to the West Coast, gives Kalman’s fans a rare opportunity to see the original artwork behind her blogs, books, and magazines spreads, as well as some of the quirky objects that inspire her. The Arty Semite sat down with Kalman recently to talk about her homecoming, her process, and why being funny is important.

Maira Kalman, ‘Self Portrait (with Pete),’ 2004-2006, guache on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Jillian Steinhauer: How does it feel to have a museum exhibition?

Maira Kalman: It’s really nice, because I don’t think of it as a show but as rooms that happen to have my work in them. It’s lovely — it’s in a museum on Fifth Avenue, the windows are huge, and the trees are going from winter to summer. Yes, there are drawings sprinkled there, and yes, there are ladders and buckets and suitcases, but it’s the same in my living room, so it feels very natural.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Elements of Style, Michael Pollan, Maira Kalman, Lemony Snicket, Jillian Steinhauer, Jewish Museum, Interviews, Illustration, Food Rules, Exhibits, Daniel Handler, Charlotte Salomon, Books, The Principles of Uncertainty, Visual Art




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