The Arty Semite

Friday Film: Weimar Cinema Beyond Caligari

By A.J. Goldmann

Getty Images
Elizabeth Bergner, who played the starring role in ‘Fräulein Else.’

“Weimar Cinema, 1919–1933: Daydreams and Nightmares,” running at MoMA until March 7, 2011, is billed as the largest-ever retrospective of German cinema from between the Wars to be shown in the United States. The era’s defining cinematic style, expressionism, is well-represented in dozens of offerings, giving a healthy dose of the atmospheric, disturbing and downright spooky in classics like “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” “M,” “Nosferatu,” “Vampyr” and “Waxworks.”

But alongside these seminal works, the 75-film retrospective — created with assistance from the F.W. Murnau Foundation in Wiesbaden and the German Kinematek in Berlin — also highlights lesser-known and in some cases downright impossible-to-find fare, such as the surviving early comedies to which Billy Wilder lent his talents as screenwriter (see the 1930 ménage à trois musical “A Blonde’s Dream”).

On December 13, the museum will screen the impossible-to-find silent version of “Fräulein Else,” adapted from the revolutionary novella by Arthur Schnizler and directed by Paul Czinner. Schnitzler’s slim volume, written in a breathless interior monologue, tells of a young woman who consents to appear naked before the benefactor who is willing to save her father from financial ruin.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Wiesbaden, Wilhelm Furtwangler, Weimar Cinema, Weimar, Virginia Woolf, Waxworks, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Vampyr, The Affairs of Anatol, Stanley Kubrick, Rosenkavalier, Salzburg Festival, Siegfried Kracauer, Paul Czinner, Nazism, Nosferatu, MoMa, Mas Ophuls, M, La Ronde, Germany, Herbert von Karajan, Holocaust, James Joyce, German Kinematek, German Film, From Caligari to Hitler, Fraulein Else, Film, F.W. Murnau Foundation, Eyes Wide Shut, Expressionism, Elizabeth Bergner, Don Giovanni, Daydreams and Nightmares, Cecil B. DeMille, Billy Wilder, Berlin, A.J. Goldmann, Arthur Schnizler, Anti-Semitism, A Blonde's Dream

Making a Mess of Comedy

By Matthew Rovner

Wiki Commons

Comedy, explained Aristotle, has a vague history, because at first no one took it seriously. We cannot know for certain if Aristotle was deadpanning, but his observation would amuse Saul Austerlitz. According to Austerlitz, American film comedy has not been taken seriously, either. In fact, the author quips, it is American film’s “bastard stepchild.” With his latest book “Another Fine Mess: A History of American Film Comedy,” Austerlitz gives us a broad survey of the genre, hoping to spark debate.

There were few Jewish comedians in Aristotle’s day, but in American comedy, Austerlitz notes, Jews are “the only minority group overrepresented.” The title of his book is taken from a catch phrase by the gentile comic geniuses Laurel and Hardy, but on the cover of the book, it is Jewish comedians, The Marx Brothers, who are making a mess. For Austerlitz, the Marx Brothers are the embodiment of Jewish humor — “anarchic, absurdist, and ebullient” — existing in the face of a hostile or dismissive power structure.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Will Ferrell, W.C. Fields, The Producers, Stanley Kubrick, Saul Austerlitz, Richard Pryor, Preston Stuges, Peter Sellers, Mel Brooks, Matthew Rovner, Marx Brothers, Mae West, Leo McCarey, Laurel and Hardy, Judd Apatow, Joel Coen, Jerry Lewis, Film, HItler, Ethan Coen, Ernst Lubitsch, Dustin Hoffman Woody Allen Albert Brooks, Comedy, Dr. Strangelove, Coen Brothers, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Books, Billy Wilder, Ben Stiller, Aristotle, Another Fine Mess

Funny Nazis? The Return (In Bulk) of Hogan’s Heroes

By Benjamin Ivry

The CBS Home Entertainment/Paramount Release of a 28 DVD-set, “Hogan’s Heroes: The Komplete Series, Kommandant’s Kollection” reminds us of this early effort to find belated humor in Hitler’s war machine. Writer/director Billy Wilder’s much-admired 1953 film “Stalag 17,” was adapted from a play of the same name by two former POWs, and subtitled: “a comedy melodrama in three acts.” Deleting the melodrama, TV’s “Hogan’s Heroes,” which ran on CBS for 168 episodes from 1965 to 1971, went for outright laughs, successfully or not.

Ambiguously, “Hogan’s Heroes” cast all the principal roles of Nazi soldiers with Jewish actors, notably two Austrian Jews who were refugees from Hitler, Leon Askin (General Burkhalter) and John Banner (Sergeant Schultz). Werner Klemperer (Colonel Klink), son of the eminent German-Jewish symphony conductor Otto Klemperer, had also fled the Nazis, arriving in Los Angeles in 1935. Was it somehow better to have buffoonish Nazis played by Jewish actors?

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Otto Klemperer, Nazis, Max Reinhardt, Louis Lebeau, Leon Askin, Leo Aschkenasy, John Banner, Hogan's Heroes, Hitler, General Burkhalter, Film, Erwin Piscator, Colonel Klink, CBS, Buchenwald, Billy Wilder, Robert Clary, Robert Max Widerman, Seargeant Shultz, Stalag 17, Television, Werner Klemperer




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