The Arty Semite

Two Views of Eichmann and Arendt

By Batya Ungar-Sargon

Crossposted from Batya Reads

Courtesy NYJFF

This year’s New York Jewish Film Festival, starting January 9, is heavy on the Holocaust. Two films, however, stand out in conversation with one another. “Hannah Arendt,” directed by Margarethe von Trotta, is a fictionalization of Arendt’s presence at the Eichmann trial. And a new documentary, “The Trial of Adolf Eichmann,” directed by Michael Prazan, attempts to retrieve the Eichmann trial from the clutches of Arendt’s highly controversial book “Eichmann in Jerusalem,” and to reinterpret the event through a different lens.

Arendt famously saw in Eichmann not a monster, but a bureaucrat following orders. She derived the term “the banality of evil” from observing Eichmann and his reactions during the trial. While the prosecution attempted to portray him as a conniving anti-Semite — the force and form behind the Final Solution — Arendt saw Eichmann as a cog in the machine of the Third Reich. She derided the theatrical nature of the trial and was deeply critical of Ben Gurion’s attempts to turn a matter of justice into a platform for nation building. The prosecution insisted on calling survivor after survivor to testify to their suffering in Germany, Poland and France. As far as Arendt was concerned, the question of Nazi atrocities had nothing to do with whether or not Eichmann was guilty of orchestrating the Final Solution.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, Michael Prazan, New York Jewish Film FEstival, Margarethe von Trotta, Hannah Arendt, Film, Batya Ungar-Sargon, Adolf Eichmann

Friday Film: Eichmann in Argentina

By Schuyler Velasco


Can a murderer be someone with no literal blood on his hands? Someone who never gave a direct order to kill? In the case of Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi leader who organized the transport of millions of Jews to death camps during the Holocaust, the answer was a resounding, unanimous “yes.” After years in hiding, Eichmann was caught in 1961 and put on trial in Jerusalem, where he was sentenced to death and hanged for his role in the Shoah. The affair is well documented in Hannah Arendt’s controversial, landmark book, “Eichmann in Jerusalem.”

However, before being captured and brought to judgment, Eichmann spent a decade hiding out in Buenos Aires with his family, working a series of odd jobs under the name Ricardo Klement. In a turn of rather puzzling behavior for a fugitive trying to keep a low profile, he sat down for a series of taped interviews with Dutch journalist and Nazi sympathizer Willem Sassen.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Schuyler Velasco, Film, Eichmann's End, Adolf Eichmann

Dusting Off an Eichmann Documentary

By Nirit Anderman

Crossposted from Haaretz

A screenshot from ‘Memories of the Eichmann Trial,’ in which photographer Henryk Ross demonstrates how he secretly snapped photos in the Lodz Ghetto, with his wife Stefania at left.

In 1979, Channel One broadcast “Memories of the Eichmann Trial,” a documentary directed for the Israeli television station by David Perlov. The movie, shot on 16mm film, was aired only once and for the 32 years since has remained unseen in the channel’s archives. The director, who passed away in 2003, did not own a copy of the documentary himself, but rather a yellowed video cassette prepared for him by the archive, which was missing the first three minutes and the closing credits.

With the 50th anniversary of the Eichmann trial this year, Perlov’s family, in cooperation with Yad Vashem, decided to save the film from oblivion. Last month, with the help of Channel One archive director Billy Segal, Perlov’s daughter Yael and Yad Vashem Visual Center director Liat Benhabib located the boxes containing the original copy of the documentary.

Read more at Haaretz.com

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Nirit Anderman, Memories of the Eichmann Trial, Liat Benhabib, Haaretz, Film, Eichmann Trial, Documentaries, David Perlov, Billy Segal, Adolf Eichmann, Yad Vashem

Hannah Arendt and the Eichmann Trial

By Deborah Lipstadt

On Wednesday, Deborah Lipstadt wrote about eerie anniversaries. She is the author of the new book “The Eichmann Trial.” Her blog posts are being featured this week on The Arty Semite courtesy of the Jewish Book Council and My Jewish Learning’s Author Blog series. For more information on the series, please visit:


I have spent much of the past few weeks talking about my new book, “The Eichmann Trial.” I don’t want to make this blog entry about the book. (To be blunt, I’d rather have folks read the book.) But something has struck me in the talks and interviews I have conducted.

For so many people the issue of the Eichmann trial remains Hannah Arendt. They seem to have a hard time conceiving of the Eichmann trial independent of Arendt’s “analysis.” I am speaking of who abhor what she said as well as of those who espouse her views.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Jewish Book Council, Holocaust, Hannah Arendt, Deborah Lipstadt, Center for Jewish History, Books, Author Blog Series, Adolf Eichmann, Judenrat, My Jewish Learning, The Eichmann Trial

April 11: An Eerie Confluence of Dates

By Deborah Lipstadt

Deborah Lipstadt’s most recent book, “The Eichmann Trial,” is now available. Her blog posts are being featured this week on The Arty Semite courtesy of the Jewish Book Council and My Jewish Learning’s Author Blog series. For more information on the series, please visit:


It was the 50th anniversary of the start of the Eichmann Trial and the 11th anniversary of the verdict (judgment) in my libel trial in the U.K. when David Irving sued me for libel for calling him a Holocaust denier.

More significantly, on April 11 I spoke at the United States State Department to mark the anniversary of the Eichmann trial. In addition to State Department staff members, there were a number of diplomats present (Turkey, Morocco, Ukraine, and Israel among others), as well as friends and colleagues. It was quite meaningful that I was speaking about this seminal act of genocide to an audience composed in part of people who deal with genocide and persecution-related issues. One of the people with whom I spoke has spent years working to rid the world of land mines. Another had been involved in the genocide in Darfur. Another had worked on issues related to the former Yugoslavia. Tragedies all.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: The Eichmann Trial, My Jewish Learning, Stephen Tyrone Johns, Jewish Book Council, Jason McCuiston, Holocaust, Genocide, Doborah Lipstadt, Darfur, David Irving, Books, Author Blog Series, Adolf Eichmann




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