The Arty Semite

Keeping Up With the Techies

By Gonny Noy

Crossposted from Haaretz

Singer Avigail Roz has spent many hours with Yoni Bloch, who produced her albums “Milchama Yomyomit” (“Daily War”), which was released three years ago, and “Hetzi Nehama” (“Half a Consolation”), forthcoming at the end of the month.

But when it comes to technology, they are on opposite sides of the barricades. While Bloch, the head of the startup Interload, defines himself as a computer geek, Roz says she finds it difficult to keep up with technological developments connected to the music world.

“I would like to know how to produce [music] at home, that’s important to me, but I’m not there yet, which puts me behind somewhat,” she says.

Read more at Haaretz.com


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Music, Haaretz, Gonny Noy, Avigail Roz, Yoni Bloch

Scintillating CDs for a New Beginning, Between Sternness and Delight

By Benjamin Ivry

Once Hosni Mubarak is liberated from his heavy chains of office, he’ll have time to kick back and appreciate some of the new classical CDs on offer. And, as many Egyptians have taken time to point out, he’s a big fan of Yiddishkeit.

The Claremont Trio: Who wouldn’t want to listen to them?

If he decides to take up American hospitality he might be especially interested in the gifted young ensemble, the Claremont Trio which has a new CD, “American Trios.” It includes works by American Jewish composers Leon Kirchner and Paul Schoenfield, the latter is an ex-kibbutznik who maintains a part-time residence in Migdal HaEmek with probably a soft spot for the Arab leader who presided over 30 years of peace with Israel. Schoenfield’s 1986 “Café Music,” especially as played by the Claremonts, is a rhythmic delight.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Paul Schoenfield, Misha Quint, Lura Johnson, Louis A. Hirsch, Isaac Stern, Leon Kirchner, Hosni Mubarak, George Rochberg, Felix Mendelssohn, Diana Mittler, Alfred Schnittke, Peter Minkler, The Claremont Trio

How To Be Jewish, Israeli, Muslim and Palestinian, All at the Same Time

By Hila Ratzabi

Courtesy Ibrahim Miari

When I entered Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church in Greenwich Village on a recent Sunday afternoon to see the play “In Between,” which explores the cultural identity of a Palestinian-Muslim/Jewish-Israeli man, I suddenly felt hyper-aware of my own Jewish identity. It seemed telling to me, and surprising, that the only current New York performance of this show was being held at a church (the play is also being staged February 9 at Nichols College in Dudley, Mass). While I’m sure there were Jews in the audience (I overheard an Israeli woman speaking with the performer after the show in Hebrew), the crowd was indeed mixed. Many attendees were members of Pax Christi, the organization that hosted the event and which is a part of the national Catholic peace movement.

“In Between” is an autobiographical one-man play created by Ibrahim Miari, who was born in Akko, Israel, to a Palestinian-Muslim father and a Jewish-Israeli mother (Miari’s mother converted to Islam in order to marry his father, though both were not religious at the time). The circumstances of his parents’ meeting are shrouded in mystery, as they were elusive about it with their two children, so Miari conceives a fictional account in which his dad spots his mom walking on the street as he drives by in a VW Beetle, blasting the Beatles song, “All You Need is Love.” Throughout the play, Miari seems to imply that while the “love-conquers-all” veneer of cross-cultural romance may appear simplistic, a sweet approach to such stories, combined with a touch of silliness, is sometimes necessary in the face of serious political conflict.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Theater, The Beatles, Pax Christi, In Between, Ibrahim Miari, Hila Ratzabi, El-Al, All You Need Is Love

House-Trained Labrador for Sale on MySpace

By Lea Penn

Crossposted from Haaretz

The story of “Labrador Labratories” (sic) should be taught in workshops for developing creativity. A year and a half ago, after the unknown Makolet band broke up, soloist Tom Gottlieb found himself suffering from a creative block. “In Makolet there was a very critical atmosphere,” he says. “We would sit a lot in the rehearsal room, think about every song for a very long time, play it for others, correct, change and correct again, until I reached a point where I was simply sick and tired of it. Music is supposed to reflect a moment, an atmosphere, a mood, a specific experience, and all that talk about what’s working and what isn’t working simply wipes that out, at least for me.”

Daniel Tchetchik

Gottlieb, 27, sat at home and tried to write alone, but his increasingly sophisticated self-criticism made that impossible.

“Simply nothing came out,” he recalls. “And then I read somewhere about an exercise for someone who has a block and is unable to write songs. The exercise was to record one album a week, no matter what emerges. The main thing is to get rid of the sense of criticism and do something.”

Read more at Haaretz.com


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Tom Gottlieb, Music, Makolet, Lea Penn, Haaretz, Labrador Labratories

A Postmodern Yiddish Satire Set in Nowhere, Arizona

By Mikhail Krutikov

A version of this post appeared in Yiddish here

The modern period in Yiddish prose began with Yisroel Aksenfeld’s novel “Dos Shterntikhl” (“The Headband”), written some time in the 1820s, which opens with a detailed description of the shtetl “Loyhoyopolie.” The name, which can be translated as “Nosuchville,” is a neologism, made up of the Hebrew words meaning “never was” and the Slavic geographical suffix, “polie.”

Boris Sandler

Aksenfeld’s artistic intention was to create a literary portrait of a shtetl that was both general and concrete. Loyhoyopolie, which incorporates features of real places, represents a typical shtetl in the Podolia region of Ukraine in the first half of the 19th century. In the decades that followed the publication of “Dos Shterntikhl,” Aksenfeld’s device was taken up by the classic Yiddish writers Mendele Moykher-Sforim and Sholom Aleichem, in the form of Glupsk and Kasrilevke, also symbolic Jewish towns.

This is one source of Forverts editor Boris Sandler’s new novella, “Keynemsdorf.” The other comes from Yiddish folklore, namely, the tales of the Wise Men of Chelm. Putting the two together, Sandler tells the story of Keynemsdorf, a shtetl located “in a forgotten corner of Arizona.” It’s inhabitants, who call themselves the “Free Citizens of Keynemsdorf,” speak a language similar to Yiddish, made up of archaic Daytshmerish and vestiges of Galician or Bessarabian dialect. The book is provided with a short glossary, ironically intended, since almost everything is understandable anyway.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Yiddish, Yisroel Aksenfeld, Wise Men of Chelm, The Headband, Sholom Aleichem, Mikhail Krutikov, Mendele Moykher-Sforim, Loyhoyopolie, Keynemsdorf, Kasrilevke, Glupsk, Forverts, Eddie Hoffman, Dos Sherntikhl, Daytshmerish, Boris Sandler, Chelm

Israeli Sitcom 'Traffic Light' Stops TV Critics in Their Tracks

By Allison Kaplan Sommer

Joseph Cultice/FOX

Male midlife crisis is apparently a cross-cultural phenomenon. The television comedy “Traffic Light,” an Israeli import, is enjoying critical acclaim on the eve of its February 8 debut on the Fox network. Sitcom humor just may be able to cross the Israel-U.S. divide.

The show centers around three 30-something buddies, each of whom is at a very different stage of life when it comes to relationships with women. One has just moved in with his girlfriend, another is married with a toddler, and the third is a swinging bachelor who can’t commit to one girl but who has a very meaningful relationship with his dog. The comedy has enjoyed two successful seasons in Israel and its creator and star Adir Miller recently won an International Emmy award for best comedy.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Traffic Light, Tim Goodman, Television, TV, Ramzor, Israeli TV, In Treatment The Ex-List, HBO, Fox, Emmy Awards, Allison Kaplan Sommer, Dorothy Rabinowitz, Adir Miller

Monday Music: For Uruguayan Pop Star Jorge Drexler, Jewishness Is a Connecting Force

By Sammy Loren

Getty Images

The Skirball Center, a sober cultural institution on Los Angeles’s ritzy Westside, was unusually alive on January 27. Music journalists, record executives and South American diplomats with an array of Spanish accents — from Argentina to Spain to East Los Angeles — bounced about the room. Along with the requisite contingent of L.A. yentas and Hollywood types, the event brought out an eclectic crowd.

They came for Jorge Drexler. When examining the life and work of the Oscar-winning musician, it becomes clear why such a diverse audience would show up.

Born in Uruguay to a German-Jewish family, 46-year-old Drexler grew up practicing classical guitar. But like others in his family, he studied medicine, eventually becoming an otolaryngologist. Yet music still beckoned, and at the urging of Joaquin Sabina, a Madrid-based singer-songwriter, Drexler left medicine — and Montevideo — for Spain.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Skirball Center, Uruguay, The Motorcycle Diaries, Spain, Sea, Shakira, Sammy Loren, Oscars, Music, Montevideo, Mercedes Sosa, Madrid, Jorge Drexler, Lleuve, Los Angeles, Eco, Frontera, Joaquin Sabina, Amar la Trama, Bajofondo Tango Club, Al Otro Lado del Rio, Warsaw Ghetto

Is an Abandoned Jerusalem Villa Better Off as a Fringe Theater?

By Noam Dvir

Crossposted from Haaretz

A few weeks from now, a new fringe theater center is slated to become home to a number of experimental groups now working in temporary spaces around the Jerusalem. The Jerusalem Theater Group, Psik and Incubator (the local branch of the Nisan Nativ Studio), will all use the new space.

The center will operate in the historic Mazya House, a beautiful urban villa located between Mordechai Eliash and Mesilat Yesharim streets near Nachlaot and the city center, which has recently undergone comprehensive renovation and preservation work.

The building has a considerable Jewish and Palestinian heritage and is characterized by fine period architecture, but over the years was left abandoned and neglected.

Read more at Haaretz.com


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Noam Dvir, Mazya House, Nisan Nativ Studio, Jerusalem Theater Group, Jerusalem, Indubator, Haaretz, Architecture, Psi

Out and About: Israeli Judaica Thieves Nabbed; Rise of the Classical Mandolin

By Ezra Glinter

Grammy nominated mandolinist Avi Avital

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Zackary Sholem Berger, Tuviah Friedman, True Grit, Thomas Ades, Schneerson Library, Out and About, Other Israel Film Festival, New World Symphony, Moyshe Nadir, Milan, Michael Tilson Thomas, Maus, Judaica, Joel Coen, Grammy Awards, Frank Gehry, Ethan Coen, Emanuel Vardi, Eleven Eleven, Dvoyre Fogel, Coen Brothers, Avi Avital, Art Spiegelman, Angouleme International Comics Festival

This Week in Forward Arts and Culture

By Ezra Glinter

  • Gabrielle Birkner watches Yossi Madmoni’s “Restoration,” the only Israeli selection at the Sundance Film Festival.

  • Pianist András Schiff talks to the Forward about growing anti-Semitism in his native Hungary.

  • Gordon Haber reflects on integration and re-segregation in his native Los Angeles.

  • Eileen Reynolds goes to see Yoav Gal’s biblically inspired space-age video opera “Mosheh.”

  • David Biale reads through the new crop of second-generation Holocaust memoirs.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: This Week in Forward Arts and Culture, The Other Woman, Sundance, Restoration, Natalie Portman, András Schiff, Yoav Gal, Yossi Madmoni

Friday Film: The Kindness of Strangers

By Paul Hiebert

Like Homer’s “Odyssey,” the film “Anita,” which screened in January at the Las Vegas Jewish Film Festival and is showing until February 8 at the New York Reelabilities film festival, is the story of someone trying to find her way home. During the 1994 bombing of the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association building in Buenos Aires, Anita becomes separated from her family. On her voyage back, Anita doesn’t encounter any gods, nymphs, or Cyclopes, but rather a disgruntled drunk, an uptight shopkeeper, and a lonely nurse.

Anita, played by Alejandra Manzo, has Down syndrome, and therefore lacks the king of Ithaca’s cunning. She knows what a phone is, but doesn’t know how to use one; she longs to be reunited with her family, but doesn’t know her home address. Like Odysseus, however, Anita must quickly bond with strangers if she hopes to survive. And what she lacks in street smarts, she makes up for in compassion. She is patient. She is kind. She is loyal to the point of relieving herself on a woman’s couch instead of disobeying a command to stay put. Anita’s gentle devotion and humble tranquility eventually win over everyone who takes her in.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Homer, Las Vegas Jewish Film Festival, Reelabilities, Paul Hiebert, Odyssey, Marcos Carnevale, Film, Buenos Aires, Argentine Israelite Mutual Association, Argentina, Anita, Alejandra Manzo

The Ones That Missed the Cut

By Saul Austerlitz

Earlier this week, Saul Austerlitz wrote about his recent author tour and five not-as-terrible-as-you-think movies. His blog posts are being featured this week on The Arty Semite courtesy of the Jewish Book Council and My Jewish Learning’s Author Blog series. For more information on the series, please visit:


One of the trickiest aspects of writing my book was figuring out how to structure it. After tinkering with a variety of approaches, I settled on 30 chapters, each dedicated to a single filmmaker or performer whose body of work I considered to be significant to the history of American film comedy. These 30 selections were joined by about 100 additional short entries on comic figures significant enough to deserve a mention, if not quite meritorious enough to earn a chapter of their own. 130 directors and actors seems like a lot, and I got to include most of the people I wanted, but as I expected from the outset, readers and reviewers have often been most interested in discussing the exclusions. (That is, after all, a significant part of the pleasure of assembling a list, and what is a book about film other than a bulked-up list of movie suggestions?) I’ve enjoyed the discussions, kept them in mind, and pondered who else might deserve inclusion. (Second edition, anyone?)

Here, then, are a handful of performers and directors who just missed the cut.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Zach Galifianakis, Woody Allen, The Office, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, The Court Jester, The Naked Gun, The Hangover, Steve Carrell, Saul Austerlitz, Robert Stack, My Jewish Learning, Michael Scott, Mel Brooks, Lloyd Bridges, Little Miss Sunshine, Leslie Nielson, Jim Abrahams, Jerry Lewis, Jerry Zucker, Jewish Book Council, Howard Hawks, It's Kind of a Funny Story, Despicable Me, Dinner for Schmucks, Film, Forbidden Planet, Gary Cooper, David Zucker, Date Night, Danny Kaye, Comedy, Borscht Belt, Books, Bored to Death, Ball of Fire, Author Blog Series, Another Fine Mess, Airplane!, A Song is Born

Dancing To the Same Beat

By Ruth Eshel

Crossposted from Haaretz

The young Maria Kong dance troupe shines in its professional production of “Miss Brazil.”

It is unlike other independent dance groups, and seems more like an offshoot of the Bat Sheva Dance Company, with the same style of movement and high quality but without Ohad Naharin’s choreography.

This is Maria Kong’s second program and it is even better than its first. Meanwhile, the company is still searching for its own path and its artistic potential has yet to be exploited.

In the first piece, “Miss,” the dancers look like the remnants of an apocalypse, figures that have undergone a metamorphosis and built a new life. A lovely metal construction sits in the middle of the stage, in this case at the Suzanne Dellal Center, a sort of moving sculpture that folds and unfolds into apartment-like spaces, of which only the metal remains. Avi-Yona Bueno’s beautiful lighting colors the structure and creates a magical atmosphere.

Read more at Haaretz.com


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Ohad Naharin, Maria Kong, Haaretz, Dance, Bat Sheva, Avi-Yona Bueno, Ruth Eshel, Suzanne Dellal

Reimagining Eve: Two Poems by Eve Grubin

By Jake Marmer

Each Thursday, The Arty Semite features excerpts and reviews of the best contemporary Jewish poetry. This week, Jake Marmer introduces two poems by Eve Grubin.

“I am certain of nothing but the holiness,” writes Eve Grubin in one of the poems published in her 2005 debut collection “Morning Prayer.” Both uncertainty and holiness are key ingredients in her writing, intertwining co-dependents, often sharing the space of a poem’s single line. As the book’s title implies, prayer — or failed attempts at it — is among Grubin’s chief concerns, and morning is the recurring setting for it, where leftover bits of dreams are lifted against the morning light in a moment of encounter with the divine. Writing is also an extension of the poet’s prayer, a religious practice of persistent observation of the life of the soul. Moments of piety often mingle with the voice of desire, yet the work is not about sensationalist juxtapositions or paradoxes — it is more about quiet meditation on the totality of human experience. It is religious poetry at its best.

This week, we’re featuring two of Grubin’s works from “Morning Prayer,” both of them re-imagining the poet’s biblical namesake, Eve. Although the first poem explicitly references verses from the Tanach, it is hardly hermeneutics or even midrash, but rather a mythic, archetypal mirror held up against the poet’s deeply personal inner world. The second poem achieves its poignancy in the two final lines, where amnesia meets the unspoken and yearning ripens into frankness.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Poetry, Morning Prayer, Jake Marmer, Bowery Poetry Club, Eve Grubin

After Ten Years, a Jewish Poetry Journal Bids Farewell

By Hila Ratzabi

Those of us who have participated in the Jewish poetry scene in New York City over the last decade might argue that the journal Mima’amakim invented it. Though Jewish women and men have been performing and publishing poetry for many decades as part of a thriving New York poetry scene, Mima’amakim established the first readings and performances that featured not only poetry written by Jews, but also poetry with specifically Jewish content. On February 5 at the Sixth Street Synagogue, Mima’amakim will hold a publication party celebrating its last issue and 10 years of publishing innovative Jewish poetry.

Meaning “from the depths,” Mima’amakim took its name from Psalm 130: “From out of the depths I called to You, God,” and was initially positioned as a forum for publishing Jewish poetry and art with a religious orientation. Founded by Chaim Strauchler in 2000 at Yeshiva University, the journal arose out of an Orthodox milieu that envisioned the artistic process as a culmination of the divine act of creation. Its first mission statement narrowly defined the journal’s purpose as a place for “creative artistic expression of the Jewish religious experience within the confines of Halachah,” even limiting the content to exclude “profanities and sexually explicit materials.”

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Yeshiva University, Steve Dalachinsky, Sixth Street Synagogue, Sarmad, Samuel Menashe, Poetry, Mima'amakim, Karen Alkalay-Gut, Jake Marmer, Hila Ratzabi, Aaron Roller, Chaim Strauchler, Dena Weiss

Out and About: Woody Allen Film To Open Cannes; The Legacy of Lenny Bruce

By Ezra Glinter

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Woody Allen, Tom Tom, Tom Segev, Simon Wiesenthal, Simon Sebag-Montefiore, Peep World, Sarah Silverman, Out and About, Mindy Abovitz, Midnight in Paris, Lenny Bruce, Jewish Review of Books, Jerusalem UFO, Hannah Arandt, Grammy Awards, Gershom Scholem, Drake, Charles King, Cannes, ArtScroll, Berenice, Albéric Magnard, Abraham Yurberg

A Living Museum in Nahariya

By Yuval Saar

Crossposted from Haaretz

Near the door of Andreas Meyer’s home in Kfar Vradim hangs an old photograph of trees alongside a stream, Nahal Ga’aton, which cuts through the city of Nahariya. Opposite is a photo, from 1908, of Meyer’s grandfather and two uncles. Both images serve as a window into 90-year-old Meyer’s life and home, as well as the history of Nahariya.

Wiki Commons

Meyer immigrated to Mandatory Palestine in 1937, arriving directly in the northern coastal city of Nahariya, which had been founded two years earlier. He made his living as a welder, a profession he had acquired as a boy in Germany.

“It was difficult in school for Jews during that period,” he relates. “My father had a small factory and one of his workers took me on as an apprentice, even though it was forbidden to apprentice Jews. When we immigrated [here], my father was wise enough to take some of our work tools on board the ship, and when we arrived in Nahariya we had an advantage. My brothers and I later opened a welding shop.”

Read more at Haaretz.com


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Kfar Vradim, Israel, Haaretz, HIstory, Andreas Meyer, Nahariya, Yuval Saar

Max Liebermann: Rediscovering a German Jewish Impressionist

By Benjamin Ivry

Turn-of-the-century German Jewish artist Max Liebermann is still not a household name despite a major 2006 Jewish Museum retrospective. Further international attention may give him the acclaim he deserves.

Liebermann was recently featured in an exhibit, “German Impressionist Landscape Painting” which after being seen at Cologne’s Wallraf-Richartz Museum from April through August, 2010, traveled to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, where it was on display from September 12 to December 5, 2010. A lavish catalogue remains, from Yale University Press, showing how hard work and love for French painters such as Manet and Millet allowed Liebermann to evolve his own visual synthesis.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Jozef Israëls, Max Liebermann, Carl and Felicie Bernstein, Emile Zola

Why Is This Passover Different From All Other Passovers?

By Katelyn Manfre

Manhattan Theatre Club
Jay Wilkison and André Braugher in ‘The Whipping Man’

Each year at Passover we gather together, crack the door a bit, and break bread of the unleavened variety. It is a celebration of freedom, of tradition, and a reminder of those ties that bind.

While the Seder depicted in Matthew Lopez’s play “The Whipping Man,” which opened February 1 at New York City Center, serves its usual function, it does so in a haunting and powerful way that only America’s most tumultuous era could create.

The year is 1865 and we are in the nearly destroyed Richmond, Va. home of the wealthy DeLeon family, a setting that gives new overtones to the age-old celebration. The war has ended, the South has fallen, and just a day ago Abraham Lincoln drew his last breath at Ford’s Theater.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Theater, Passover, The Whipping Man, New York City Center, Matthew Lopez, Jay Wilkison, Katelyn Manfre, Doughlas Hughes, Confederacy, Civil War, André Braugher, André Holland, Abraham Lincoln

Five Not-As-Terrible-As-You-Think Comedy Movies

By Saul Austerlitz

Saul Austerlitz is the author of “Another Fine Mess: A History of American Film Comedy.” His blog posts are appearing this week on The Arty Semite courtesy of the Jewish Book Council and My Jewish Learning’s Author Blog series. For more information on the series please visit:


In writing my book “Another Fine Mess: A History of American Film Comedy,” I spent a lot of time concentrating on the greatest films in the history of American comedy: your City Lights, your Shop Around the Corners, your Annie Halls. But often, the most pleasurable films I watched over the course of researching my book were the ones that were surprisingly decent. The mediocre films that turned out to be pretty funny; the supposedly terrible movies that I found myself, to my surprise, enjoying.

In their honor, I’d like to single out five pleasant surprises from among the ranks of American comedies. These might not be movies you’d want at the top of your Netflix queue, but you might find yourself pleasantly surprised if you happened to come across them, anyway.

Read more


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Teacher's Pet, Steve Martin, Shop Around the Corner, Sherman Klump, Saul Austerlitz, Ronald Reagan, Ron Burgundy, Rock Hudson, Ricky Bobby, Razzies, Randy Newman, Norbit, Napoleon Dynamite, Nancy Kerrigan, My Jewish Learning, Martin Short, Lorne Michaels, Jon Heder, Jewish Book Council, Jerry Lewis, Hardly Working, Gordon MacRae, Gig Young, George Seaton, Film, El Guapo, Eddie Murphy, Doris Day, Comedy, Clark Gable, City Lights, Chevy Chase, Chazz Michael Michaels, Brian Robbins, Books, Bo Hooper, Blades of Glory, Author Blog Series, Another Fine Mess, Annie Hall, Three Amigos, Tony Randall, Tonya Harding



Find us on Facebook!
  • More than 50 former Israeli soldiers have refused to serve in the current ground operation in #Gaza.
  • "My wife and I are both half-Jewish. Both of us very much felt and feel American first and Jewish second. We are currently debating whether we should send our daughter to a Jewish pre-K and kindergarten program or to a public one. Pros? Give her a Jewish community and identity that she could build on throughout her life. Cons? Costs a lot of money; She will enter school with the idea that being Jewish makes her different somehow instead of something that you do after or in addition to regular school. Maybe a Shabbat sing-along would be enough?"
  • Undeterred by the conflict, 24 Jews participated in the first ever Jewish National Fund— JDate singles trip to Israel. Translation: Jews age 30 to 45 travelled to Israel to get it on in the sun, with a side of hummus.
  • "It pains and shocks me to say this, but here goes: My father was right all along. He always told me, as I spouted liberal talking points at the Shabbos table and challenged his hawkish views on Israel and the Palestinians to his unending chagrin, that I would one day change my tune." Have you had a similar experience?
  • "'What’s this, mommy?' she asked, while pulling at the purple sleeve to unwrap this mysterious little gift mom keeps hidden in the inside pocket of her bag. Oh boy, how do I answer?"
  • "I fear that we are witnessing the end of politics in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I see no possibility for resolution right now. I look into the future and see only a void." What do you think?
  • Not a gazillionaire? Take the "poor door."
  • "We will do what we must to protect our people. We have that right. We are not less deserving of life and quiet than anyone else. No more apologies."
  • "Woody Allen should have quit while he was ahead." Ezra Glinter's review of "Magic in the Moonlight": http://jd.fo/f4Q1Q
  • Jon Stewart responds to his critics: “Look, obviously there are many strong opinions on this. But just merely mentioning Israel or questioning in any way the effectiveness or humanity of Israel’s policies is not the same thing as being pro-Hamas.”
  • "My bat mitzvah party took place in our living room. There were only a few Jewish kids there, and only one from my Sunday school class. She sat in the corner, wearing the right clothes, asking her mom when they could go." The latest in our Promised Lands series — what state should we visit next?
  • Former Israeli National Security Advisor Yaakov Amidror: “A cease-fire will mean that anytime Hamas wants to fight it can. Occupation of Gaza will bring longer-term quiet, but the price will be very high.” What do you think?
  • Should couples sign a pre-pregnancy contract, outlining how caring for the infant will be equally divided between the two parties involved? Just think of it as a ketubah for expectant parents:
  • Many #Israelis can't make it to bomb shelters in time. One of them is Amos Oz.
  • According to Israeli professor Mordechai Kedar, “the only thing that can deter terrorists, like those who kidnapped the children and killed them, is the knowledge that their sister or their mother will be raped."
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.