The Arty Semite

This Week in Forward Arts and Culture

By Ezra Glinter

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Dan Friedman introduces Asaf Hanuka, an Israeli graphic artist who worked on “Waltz With Bashir,” and whose comic “The Realist” will appear online at the Forward each week.

In the new installment of the Nigun Project, Jeremiah Lockwood and Cynthia Hopkins (of Gloria Deluxe) perform their version of the Chabad version of the Russian drinking song, “Surely There Will Be Vodka.”

Philologos reacts to the news that Conservative Judaism is considering a name change, and suggests some possibilities. (“Not Too Meshuggene and Not Too Goyishe Judaism,” anyone?)

Elana Maryles Sztokman profiles Bambi Sheleg, founder and editor-in-chief of the alternative Israeli magazine Eretz Acheret.

Susan Comninos reviews “Displaced Persons” by Ghita Schwarz, a debut novel that traces the psychological strangeness of navigating normal society after surviving the Holocaust.

Dan Friedman (the indefatigable) also reviews “The Last Survivor,” a film in which survivors of the Holocaust and the genocides in Rwanda, Congo and Darfur tell their stories.

Aviva Kempner goes to see “Army of Crime,” a movie about an Armenian poet and his two Jewish colleagues fighting Nazis in Paris.

Itzik Gottesman partakes of Yiddish Summer Weimar, one of the most intense summer Yiddish events on the planet.

Elissa Strauss rounds-up this season’s best reads on The Sisterhood.

Remember to mark down August 24 for “3 Alicias 3,” featuring performances by composer and klezmer fiddler Alicia Svigals, poet and critic Alicia Ostriker and singer, songwriter and violinist Alicia Jo Rabins.

And this week on the Forverts video channel, “In Memoriam: August 12th, 1952,” features readings and interviews with Soviet-Yiddish writers:

In Memoriam: August 12th, 1952 from Forverts on Vimeo.


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