The Arty Semite

Two Poems By Steve Dalachinsky

By Jake Marmer

  • Print
  • Share Share

If you find yourself at an avant-garde jazz concert and poet Steve Dalachinsky is not in the audience, you probably have the wrong address. An unparalleled jazz aficionado, Dalachinsky has soaked in enough of the music to attempt the impossible: to create the same indescribable, musical feeling through words.

But with distinct influences of Dada and Surrealism, a Beatnik sensibility, and a dry sense of humor, Dalachinsky really does not like to be branded as a jazz poet. Or branded in any way for that matter, because, as with real, experimental jazz, descriptions grow stale the minute they are formulated, left far behind the racing, morphing voice. As Nietzsche said, things are dead once you’re able to say them.

In Dalachinsky’s poetry, however, thought flows like a saxophone melody: alive and unhindered, suggestive rather than descriptive, fragmented, and held together with a musical sort of logic.

Dalachinsky’s books include the PEN Oakland National Book Award winner “The Final Nite” (Ugly Duckling Presse), as well as numerous other publications, chapbooks, and liner notes for experimental jazz recordings. His 1999 CD, Incomplete Directions (Knitting Factory Records) features a collection of original poetry read in collaboration with musicians such as William Parker, Matthew Shipp, Daniel Carter, Sabir Mateen, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth) and Vernon Reid (Living Color). Among his recent recordings is “Phenomena of Interference,” (Hopscotch Records 2005), a collaboration with pianist Matthew Shipp.

On June 30, Dalachinsky will be joining me for a performance on the roof of the Educational Alliance on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

In the meantime, here are two of Dalachinsky’s recent poems: 

the synagogue in st. sebastian’s square  
 
photographs of pieces
  of close ups
scab-wiggled shapes
horizontal memories / drinking tea
   eating jealousy
            hands running wild away from secondary thwack
sebaceous schooner scuttle atop
                   stone upon a dead black sea
          awake from pillows of bitter salt  
                 a secular sulker
 
 mosaics of moses
      pharoah’s daughter finds bones to pick
              dimpled flesh aloose in the bulrushes
                    cemetery of darkcloth where ram stood
                         & horn blew
           crystal off shore caught in rigor
                     rigger caught in mast ropes
                                 my people leave the hull & wander
                                                    upward toward the statue
                   & other false idols
                               pyramids not built in a day
                          plague a pully we from bully passed over
                                    growing up a deliverer
                                           never to enter a land of harsh promises
                                                   crooked kabal carved in every nite
                                betrayal of trials & caved in broken columns
                                               contrariwise clockworks blue lady candle burn
                                                                shepherded
                                                cash being able to chemicollage electric self enslavement
                                                                     never having been sold in the market
                                                                          the burning bush burning still
                                                                            
                                                            i am my only son.
 
dalachinsky from 2 fragments and improv 5/15/10
 
                        
The First Cemetery of Spanish & Portuguese Synagogue (1656-1833 )



inside chinatown’s thigh

near the edge of st. james’ cross

by oliver street

& described as “OUTSIDE the CITY”

lies a dark acre of nameless tombstones

a sweet & sacrilegious monument to judaism

consecrated in 1656

cornered by brick

& bridged by steel & clay

the ashes of ashes
the dust of dust
on this cold & dismal ash wednesday.

a triangle of empty benches

the prickly wild berry trees

lining the black wrought iron

spear-tipped gate

some secret inside the tombs

the vacant geometric forms

so worn & final
resting “en un espacio pequeno y solemne

para Shearith Israel”

a remnant of a prayer for the souls

of the wandering dead

who now repose

in god’s new world.



steve dalachinsky nyc 3/4/81=20


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Steve Dalachinsky, Sonic Youth, Sabir Mateen, Poetry, Nietzsche, Matthew Shipp, Living Color, Jake Marmer, Daniel Carter, Dada, Surrealism, Thurston Moore, Vernon Reid, William Parker

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • Lusia Horowitz left pre-state Israel to fight fascism in Spain — and wound up being captured by the Nazis and sent to die at Auschwitz. Share her remarkable story — told in her letters.
  • Vered Guttman doesn't usually get nervous about cooking for 20 people, even for Passover. But last night was a bit different. She was cooking for the Obamas at the White House Seder.
  • A grumpy Jewish grandfather is wary of his granddaughter's celebrating Easter with the in-laws. But the Seesaw says it might just make her appreciate Judaism more. What do you think?
  • “Twist and Shout.” “Under the Boardwalk.” “Brown-Eyed Girl.” What do these great songs have in common? A forgotten Jewish songwriter. We tracked him down.
  • What can we learn from tragedies like the rampage in suburban Kansas City? For one thing, we must keep our eyes on the real threats that we as Jews face.
  • When is a legume not necessarily a legume? Philologos has the answer.
  • "Sometime in my childhood, I realized that the Exodus wasn’t as remote or as faceless as I thought it was, because I knew a former slave. His name was Hersh Nemes, and he was my grandfather." Share this moving Passover essay!
  • Getting ready for Seder? Chag Sameach! http://jd.fo/q3LO2
  • "We are not so far removed from the tragedies of the past, and as Jews sit down to the Seder meal, this event is a teachable moment of how the hatred of Jews-as-Other is still alive and well. It is not realistic to be complacent."
  • Aperitif Cocktail, Tequila Shot, Tom Collins or Vodka Soda — Which son do you relate to?
  • Elvis craved bacon on tour. Michael Jackson craved matzo ball soup. We've got the recipe.
  • This is the face of hatred.
  • What could be wrong with a bunch of guys kicking back with a steak and a couple of beers and talking about the Seder? Try everything. #ManSeder
  • BREAKING: Smirking killer singled out Jews for death in suburban Kansas City rampage. 3 die in bloody rampage at JCC and retirement home.
  • Real exodus? For Mimi Minsky, it's screaming kids and demanding hubby on way down to Miami, not matzo in the desert.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.