Sisterhood Blog

Barbra Streisand Steals the Oscars Show

By Raquel Laneri

My favorite segment of the Oscars, every year, is the “In Memoriam,” in which the ceremony takes a break from the terrible jokes and bloated musical numbers and faux displays of humility to honor those colleagues who have died in the past year. Unlike the rest of the awards ceremony, the “In Memoriam” doesn’t just honor the beautiful people—the Anne Hathaways and George Clooneys who light up the screen—but all the unsung heroes who toil in the backgrounds, or on the margins, of the industry.

getty images
Barbra Streisand

The segment honors the experimental filmmakers (like Chris Marker, honored this year), the costume designers (the surrealist Eiko Ishioka, who was posthumously nominated for her work in Mirror/Mirror this year), and the dozens of unglamorous cinematographers, sound production engineers, and special effects gurus who give the movies so much of their magic.

This year’s tribute was particularly wonderful, because at the end Barbara Streisand emerged — wearing a diaphanous black gown and dripping in gold sequins and chains — to honor to the late songwriter Marvin Hamlisch. She performed one of his songs, “The Way We Were,” from the film in which she starred with Robert Redford.

I always like seeing (and hearing) Babs at these things. Not just because I was weaned on “Funny Girl” and “Yentl” as a girl, and not just because she’s a great performer, but also because her no-BS attitude, her brash diva fabulosity, and her unconventional (or, rather, non-Hollywood cookie cutter) beauty is a welcome respite from the sea of pale, delicate sylphs stalking the stage and red carpet.

Even Streisand’s outfit, with its unapologetic glitz and that rather ill-advised choker, injected some much-needed variation the standard fashion parade of pale pink confections and nude-colored gowns. That Streisand has managed to break into the industry, win awards, and stay relevant, without compromising or trying to hide her “otherness,” is awe-inspiring.

The Oscars red carpet has never been particularly diverse, and this year was no exception. Hathaway in pale pink Prada, next. Jennifer Lawrence in princess-like Dior. Yawn.

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