Sisterhood Blog

Lisa Kudrow Loves Her Nose Job

By Elissa Strauss

  • Print
  • Share Share

As far as my teenage self was concerned, one was either a “Friends” fan or a “Seinfeld” fan and I counted myself as a strict devotee of Jerry and Co. That said, if I ever did watch “Friends” it was always because of Lisa Kudrow’s character Phoebe, whose village idiot shtick served as the perfect existential foil to Jennifer Aniston’s shiny hair and all that those famous tresses implied. Since then Kudrow has gone on to do shows like “The Comeback” and her hilarious web series “Web Therapy,” in which she further exposes that terrific darkness I sensed on “Friends.”

The Saturday Evening Post published an interview with Kudrow, who is now on the hit show “Scandal,” and in it she reveals more depth and nuance than a hundred Jennifer Aniston cover stories combined. She’s got very smart things to say about topics like marriage, success and reality television, though the highlight for me was her very uncomplicated relationship with her nose job.

Getty Images
Lisa Kudrow

Kudrow, born in 1963, grew up in a middle-class Jewish household in Encino, CA. Unsurprisingly for a female comedian, she had a tough time as a teenager. In junior high, where the “meanest people were popular,” her best friends ditched her and when she got to college at Vassar she met some very casual anti-Semites.

Like most humans — though rarely actors in magazine interviews — Kudrow admits to having always struggled with her need to feel loved by others and herself. Of fame she said: “I had always thought that fame would give you permission to lighten up on yourself. If everybody else likes you, you could finally have permission to love yourself. It’s not true.”

But despite all this ruminating on self-acceptance, she was rather nonchalant about her decision to get a nose job. I love her for this.

Talking about her nose job, Kudrow said:

That was life altering. I went from, in my mind, hideous, to not hideous. I did it the summer before going to a new high school. So there were plenty of people who wouldn’t know how hideous I looked before. That was a good, good, good change.

Much has been said on why plastic surgery is horrible and indeed much is horrible about it. Women, who get 90% of it, receive a lot of pressure to look a certain way and that way is almost always the wide-eyed, full-lipped, Anglo-Saxon button-nose, tan-but-not-too-tan one that women around the world pay top dollar to achieve. But sometimes a nose job is, well, just a nose job, and I love how Kudrow treats it just so.

In a world were going under-the-knife is often associated with the “Real Housewives” franchise, it is important to remember that most people who have plastic surgery don’t end up looking like Anime characters. Also, they tend to have realistic expectations about the impact the procedure will have on their lives.

Sure, Kudrow could be beating herself up for succumbing to the pressure to look a certain way and ultimately betraying her entire gender in all their natural glory. Instead she just acknowledges that that fix made her feel a whole lot better about herself during a rather tough time in her life and gave her the confidence to put herself out there in a way that made her who she is today, crow’s feet and all. Amen, sister.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: nose job, Lisa Kudrow, Jewish, Jennifer Aniston, Friends

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • This guy skipped out on seder at his mom's and won a $1 million in a poker tournament. Worth it?
  • Sigal Samuel's family amulet isn't just rumored to have magical powers. It's also a symbol of how Jewish and Indian rituals became intertwined over the centuries. http://jd.fo/a3BvD Only three days left to submit! Tell us the story of your family's Jewish heirloom.
  • British Jews are having their 'Open Hillel' moment. Do you think Israel advocacy on campus runs the risk of excluding some Jewish students?
  • "What I didn’t realize before my trip was that I would leave Uganda with a powerful mandate on my shoulders — almost as if I had personally left Egypt."
  • Is it better to have a young, fresh rabbi, or a rabbi who stays with the same congregation for a long time? What do you think?
  • Why does the leader of Israel's social protest movement now work in a beauty parlor instead of the Knesset?
  • What's it like to be Chagall's granddaughter?
  • Is pot kosher for Passover. The rabbis say no, especially for Ashkenazi Jews. And it doesn't matter if its the unofficial Pot Day of April 20.
  • A Ukrainian rabbi says he thinks the leaflets ordering Jews in restive Donetsk to 'register' were a hoax. But the disturbing story still won't die.
  • Some snacks to help you get through the second half of Passover.
  • You wouldn't think that a Soviet-Jewish immigrant would find much in common with Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But the famed novelist once helped one man find his first love. http://jd.fo/f3JiS
  • Can you relate?
  • The Forverts' "Bintel Brief" advice column ran for more than 65 years. Now it's getting a second life — as a cartoon.
  • Half of this Hillel's members believe Jesus was the Messiah.
  • Vinyl isn't just for hipsters and hippies. Israeli photographer Eilan Paz documents the most astonishing record collections from around the world:http://jd.fo/g3IyM
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.