Sisterhood Blog

Egyptian Women: Brave in Brutal Times

By Allison Kaplan Sommer

  • Print
  • Share Share
Getty Images
Egyptian women protest in Cairo, December 20, 2011.

Before, during and after the fall of President Hosni Mubarak, women have been the focus of the protracted conflict in Egypt between grassroots protesters and the military regime. First it was the attack on CBS reporter Lara Logan, then the so-called ‘virginity checks’ on women protesters detained by the Egyptian army. And this past week the world was shocked by to the horrific photographs of female demonstrators being beaten with metal poles, kicked and stepped on and then discarded like garbage. What galvanized world opinion was one photograph that will become iconic, of the demonstrator whose black robe was ripped from her body, laid prostrate on the ground with her blue bra exposed. Max Fisher wrote in The Atlantic that:

there is something especially barbaric about this photo. The taboo of violence against unarmed women is unusually strong in the Arab world. But to watch three soldiers beat a defenseless woman with batons, their fists, and for one extraordinarily cruel soldier with his boot, is not even the most provocative part. For these men to pull her black abaya above her head and expose her midriff and chest is, for Egypt, a profound and sexually charged humiliation. And there is a certain awful irony of using that abaya, a symbol of modesty and piety, to cover her face and drag her on the street.

Adding insult to injury, the military has repeatedly justified brutal and sexually aggressive treatment of female protesters by calling them immoral and accusing them of being loose women at best, and prostitutes at worst.

Impressively, Egyptian women seem to be stronger than the pressure being applied to them. On Tuesday they showed that they wouldn’t be intimidated by the beatings and the threat of bodily harm, and hundreds turned out for what is being called the largest all-female demonstration ever to be held in the country.

It seems to me that Egyptian women are between a rock and a hard place. On one side are the brutal forces of military dictatorship clinging to power. On the other is a gentler, but still frightening form of oppression that looms in the aftermath of the first round of elections that were recently held in the country, which handed a decisive victory to the Islamists: both the Muslim Brotherhood and the extreme Salafists. The Salafists immediately began speaking openly about legislation that would force gender segregation, require women to wear modest dress and other steps that would move Egyptian law closer to traditional Sharia law. Another troubling sign of the election results was the fact that female representation in the government will be tiny to non-existent. Neither dictatorship nor democracy seems to point to a very promising future for the fearless Egyptian women who rallied so bravely in the streets of Cairo.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: March, Egypt, Cairo

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.




Find us on Facebook!
  • Some snacks to help you get through the second half of Passover.
  • You wouldn't think that a Soviet-Jewish immigrant would find much in common with Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But the famed novelist once helped one man find his first love. http://jd.fo/f3JiS
  • Can you relate?
  • The Forverts' "Bintel Brief" advice column ran for more than 65 years. Now it's getting a second life — as a cartoon.
  • Half of this Hillel's members believe Jesus was the Messiah.
  • Vinyl isn't just for hipsters and hippies. Israeli photographer Eilan Paz documents the most astonishing record collections from around the world:http://jd.fo/g3IyM
  • Could Spider-Man be Jewish? Andrew Garfield thinks so.
  • Most tasteless video ever? A new video shows Jesus Christ dying at Auschwitz.
  • "It’s the smell that hits me first — musty, almost sweet, emanating from the green felt that cradles each piece of silver cutlery in its own place." Only one week left to submit! Tell us the story of your family's Jewish heirloom.
  • Mazel tov to Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky!
  • If it's true, it's pretty terrifying news.
  • “My mom went to cook at the White House and all I got was this tiny piece of leftover raspberry ganache."
  • Planning on catching "Fading Gigolo" this weekend? Read our review.
  • A new initiative will spend $300 million a year towards strengthening Israel's relationship with the Diaspora. http://jd.fo/q3Iaj Is this money spent wisely?
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.