Sisterhood Blog

Pregnancy, Swine Flu and Mourning Bracha Feiga Williger

By Rebecca Honig Friedman

  • Print
  • Share Share

Like Debra, I too am a “Dirty Dancing” fan and was deeply saddened to hear of Patrick Swayze’s death. But someone whose death this week had not yet been added to Wikipedia when I checked this morning is Bracha Feiga Williger, the 23rd victim of the H1N1 virus in Israel.

While Williger’s death hasn’t caused the media frenzy that Swayze’s has, it has gotten a fair amount of coverage, even outside of Israel, than one might expect for the death of a regular awoman because Williger was in her 39th week of pregnancy — her fetus died a few days earlier, and she passed shortly after delivering it. She leaves behind 10 children and a husband. Williger was in her early to mid-thirties (mainstream reports say she was 33, Yeshiva World News reported 35).

Williger was the third reported pregnant woman to come down with H1N1 in Israel and the first to die of the virus. (The first and second delivered early through C-sections.) Her case emphasizes that pregnancy is another risk factor for complication of H1N1.

Needless to say, this death saddens and scares me more than Patrick Swayze’s. But, leaving emotions aside for a moment, comparing the different reports of Williger’s death also provides an interesting window into the decisions that journalists and media outlets make, and how one need often read multiple reports to get the full story.

A Ynet breaking news update led with, “A mother of 10, aged 33, has died at the Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital in Jerusalem after being diagnosed with swine flu,” and went on to note the circumstances of her delivering her unborn fetus. Haaretz’s initial brief left out the part about her being a mother of 10, but noted that she was the 23rd Israeli to succumb to the virus and that, “More than 3,000 people have been diagnosed with swine flu in Israel, including 11 in intensive care.”

A subsequent full-length article in Haaretz also focused on the relevance of Williger’s case to the larger H1N1 situation in Israel, and the effectiveness, or ineffectiveness, of various drugs used to treat the disease. This article revised a fact in the brief, saying she was the 22nd person to die of H1N1 in Israel, and noted, “The woman had a history of obesity, which placed her in a high-risk group.”

The JPost’s short article led with that bit and added another fact not noted in Ynet or Haaretz, that she hadn’t immediately sought treatment for her symptoms: “A pregnant and overweight 33-year-old woman who had signs of the H1N1 flu for a week before going to the doctor went to Jerusalem’s Bikur Holim Hospital in Sunday where her fetus was found to be dead a week before term.” This article also notes that “she died despite all the efforts of doctors to save her,” and adds a warning from the health department that those in high risk groups, as Williger was, should seek immediate attention for any flu-like symptoms. The subtext here, I think it’s fair to say, is that Williger could have prevented her own tragedy if she’d taken better care of herself.

JTA’s lede includes all the basic facts: “A 33-year-old pregnant mother of 10 became Israel’s 23rd death related to swine flu.” Interestingly, it goes on to note the guidelines recently issued by the Israeli Health Ministry “for the religiously observant to help them avoid contracting swine flu in religious institutions.”

But what none of these mainstream media outlets mention is the name Bracha Feiga Williger or the fact that she was ultra-Orthodox. For that information we turn to The Yeshiva World News:

A 35-year-old chareidi woman, Bracha Feiga Williger A”H, a resident of Beit Shemesh, was niftar earlier on Sunday in Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital due to “complications of swine flu”. She gave birth to a still born earlier in the day, apparently a victim of the illness too R”L.

She is survived by her husband and 10 children, the eldest being 14 and the youngest 18 months. The husband, R’ Avraham, is a maggid shiur in a Satmar yeshiva ketana in Yerushalayim.

Doctors rushed the woman into emergency surgery and realized the infant was dead. Her condition then took a sharp turn for the worse and efforts to save her life were unsuccessful. She returned her neshama to her Creator at 5:10pm.

Information regarding the levaya to be announced.

For most of us the woman’s name, her husband’s profession, or the ages of her children are not as relevant as the details of her death so we can learn from them, the better to protect ourselves from a similar fate. Notably, Yeshiva World News doesn’t include any warnings from the health department or guidelines about how to prevent the spread of the virus. Its focus is completely on this woman and her family.

If it were a mainstream publication, including those personal details might even be considered an invasion of privacy. Noting that she was Satmar might be perceived as biased in some way, particularly in Israel where tensions with the ultra-Orthodox are running high these days.

Yet knowing those details make this story, this woman, more real. And while I wouldn’t rely on Yeshiva World News as my primary news source, I appreciate the way the publication makes this tragic death into something more than an incident to integrate into our swine flu schema. It makes her death something to mourn.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Swine Flu, H1N1, Patrick Swayze, Bracha Feiga Williger

The Jewish Daily Forward welcomes reader comments in order to promote thoughtful discussion on issues of importance to the Jewish community. In the interest of maintaining a civil forum, The Jewish Daily Forwardrequires that all commenters be appropriately respectful toward our writers, other commenters and the subjects of the articles. Vigorous debate and reasoned critique are welcome; name-calling and personal invective are not. While we generally do not seek to edit or actively moderate comments, our spam filter prevents most links and certain key words from being posted and The Jewish Daily Forward reserves the right to remove comments for any reason.


Comments
Elana Tue. Sep 15, 2009

An interesting analysis of journalistic tendencies... But while it's nice to extol the haredi paper's willingness to put a human face on her tragedy, they only did it BECAUSE she was haredi. Compare this, for example, to Debra's piece from earlier this week about the woman reporter who was spat upon by haredi men. She was completely dehumanized for not being haredi.

Reminds me of Seyla Benhabib's, "The generalized and concrete other" -- we are much more likely to see details in ourselves (or those deemed like us) and to generalize about others....

RHF Tue. Sep 15, 2009

Actually, I was kind of surprised that they mentioned this woman's name at all precisely because they are haredi and she is a woman. I know it's sometimes the practice that women's names are not to be mentioned in public except as Mrs. So-and-so.




Find us on Facebook!
  • PHOTOS: Hundreds of protesters marched through lower Manhattan yesterday demanding an end to American support for Israel’s operation in #Gaza.
  • Does #Hamas have to lose for there to be peace? Read the latest analysis by J.J. Goldberg.
  • This is what the rockets over Israel and Gaza look like from space:
  • "Israel should not let captives languish or corpses rot. It should do everything in its power to recover people and bodies. Jewish law places a premium on pidyon shvuyim, “the redemption of captives,” and proper burial. But not when the price will lead to more death and more kidnappings." Do you agree?
  • Slate.com's Allison Benedikt wrote that Taglit-Birthright Israel is partly to blame for the death of American IDF volunteer Max Steinberg. This is why she's wrong:
  • Israeli soldiers want you to buy them socks. And snacks. And backpacks. And underwear. And pizza. So claim dozens of fundraising campaigns launched by American Jewish and Israeli charities since the start of the current wave of crisis and conflict in Israel and Gaza.
  • The sign reads: “Dogs are allowed in this establishment but Zionists are not under any circumstances.”
  • Is Twitter Israel's new worst enemy?
  • More than 50 former Israeli soldiers have refused to serve in the current ground operation in #Gaza.
  • "My wife and I are both half-Jewish. Both of us very much felt and feel American first and Jewish second. We are currently debating whether we should send our daughter to a Jewish pre-K and kindergarten program or to a public one. Pros? Give her a Jewish community and identity that she could build on throughout her life. Cons? Costs a lot of money; She will enter school with the idea that being Jewish makes her different somehow instead of something that you do after or in addition to regular school. Maybe a Shabbat sing-along would be enough?"
  • Undeterred by the conflict, 24 Jews participated in the first ever Jewish National Fund— JDate singles trip to Israel. Translation: Jews age 30 to 45 travelled to Israel to get it on in the sun, with a side of hummus.
  • "It pains and shocks me to say this, but here goes: My father was right all along. He always told me, as I spouted liberal talking points at the Shabbos table and challenged his hawkish views on Israel and the Palestinians to his unending chagrin, that I would one day change my tune." Have you had a similar experience?
  • "'What’s this, mommy?' she asked, while pulling at the purple sleeve to unwrap this mysterious little gift mom keeps hidden in the inside pocket of her bag. Oh boy, how do I answer?"
  • "I fear that we are witnessing the end of politics in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I see no possibility for resolution right now. I look into the future and see only a void." What do you think?
  • Not a gazillionaire? Take the "poor door."
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.