Forward Thinking

Obama's Israel Trip: The Logo

By Renee Ghert-Zand

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In marketing, they say that branding is everything. And apparently there isn’t anything these days that can’t be branded — including a presidential trip to Israel.

Believe it or not, President Barack Obama’s upcoming trip to Israel already has a name, and an official logo to go with it is in the works. “Unshakeable Alliance” (*brit amim *, or alliance of nations, in Hebrew) is not just some security operation’s code name. It’s the Israeli government’s first-ever attempt at all-out branding of a visit by a foreign head of state.

With Obama’s past comments about the United States’ “unshakeable commitment to Israel,” and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s remarks about an “unshakeable bond” between the two countries, it wasn’t that much of a stretch to come up with “Unshakeable Alliance.” However, deciding on the official logo seems to be a bit more complicated.

In a savvy public relations move, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government is calling on Israelis active on Facebook to vote for their favorite of three logos commissioned from different graphic artists by the PMO’s National Information Directorate.

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Team Barack: Mitt 'Failed Audition' on Trip

By Nathan Guttman

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Barack Obama

The Mitt Romney world tour is over, and now it’s time for President Obama’s team to put its own (negative) spin on the globe-trotting GOP candidate.

The Obama campaign put together a press call today with senior advisers Robert Gibbs and Colin Kahl, to poke some fun at Romeny’s gaffes and to remind angry reporters that the presumptive Republican nominee avoided taking any questions from the press during his seven-day tour of England, Israel and Poland.

Obama’s campaign main message to the press was that Romney “failed his audition” for the role of commander-in-chief and leader of the free world.

According to Gibbs and Khal, the trip, to three friendly countries, was an easy opportunity for Romney to burnish his foreign policy credentials, but, they argue, he blew it.

“He couldn’t even handle the low bar that his campaign set for him,” said Khal.

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