Forward Thinking

'Dr. King Demanded Justice'

By Alan van Capelle

Alan van Capelle

The following speech was delivered at this week’s ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

Fifty years ago a Rabbi shared these steps with Dr. King and began his remarks by saying, “I speak to you as an American Jew.”

My name is Alan van Capelle, and today I speak to you as an American Jew. I represent the Jewish Civil Rights Group Bend the Arc, and the more than thirty organizations collectively called the Jewish Social Justice Roundtable.

The vision Dr. King offered us fifty years ago wasn’t only a dream. It was a call for equality but it was also a demand for justice.

We may be closer to legal equality but we are far, far, far from justice. We are far from justice when young black men are stopped and frisked and disrespected on the streets of New York City.

We are far from justice when students carry the burden of loans.

We are far from justice when 11 million immigrants work every single day without protections or a pathway to citizenship.

We are far from justice when a gay, lesbian, or transgender person can be fired from their job simply for being who they are.

We are far from justice when we accept the fact that the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer, and we allow American children to go to bed hungry.

Yes, the moral arc of the universe is long and it does in fact bend towards justice, but it doesn’t bend on its own. It bends because of people like Bayard Rustin, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Mickey Schwerner. It bends because of you and me. We make the arc bend. And for many of us, it’s not bending fast enough.

Every year Jews around the world recall how Moses led his people out of slavery and towards the Promised Land. But the desert came first.

Jews believe that the only way to the Promised Land is through the desert. We are taught that “there is no way to get from here to there except by joining together and marching.”

Fifty years after Dr. King delivered his speech from these very steps we are still a people wandering through the desert. But don’t be discouraged. Because I’m not.

When I look around this Mall, at all of you – so diverse, so impassioned, so bonded together by shared values, hopes, and dreams – then I can hear in your voices the echo of Dr. King, and I know that the edge of the desert is near, and the promised land within sight.

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: martin luther king, march on washington, equality, civil rights

Two Giants in Baltimore

By Nathan Guttman

Robert A. Cumins/JFNA

Reminiscing on the golden days of Jewish American activism, two heroes of the Soviet Jewry movement took to the stage at the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of North America in its main plenary session on Monday.

Natan Sharansky, the former refusnik who is now head of the Jewish Agency for Israel and Nobel peace prize laureate Eli Wiesel, shared the stage as the Jewish community marked the 25th anniversary of the 1987 March on Washington, a seminal moment in the struggle to free Soviet Jewry and a high point in Jewish mobilization for a national cause.

The idea for the march on Washington, planned to coincide with a meeting between President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, came from both sides of the Iron Curtain, with activists on both ends sharing the vision of a massive call for opening immigration doors to Soviet Jews. Sharansky was released from the Russian prison several months before the December 6 protest, which brought more than 250,000 Jewish activists to the nation’s capital.

“We showed how strong we are as a people,” Sharansky said. “When we feel this power, as one people and one family, we can change the world.”

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Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: soviet, natan sharansky, elie wiesel, jewry, march on washington, Jewish Federations of North America, General Assembly




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