Forward Thinking

Hamas Accepts 2 States, '67 Borders: Report

By J.J. Goldberg

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Zvi Barel, Haaretz’s impeccably cautious Middle East commentator, reports (might be paywall; here is the Hebrew original) that Hamas secretary general Khaled Meshaal has agreed to accept a two-state solution, with a Palestinian state alongside Israel based on the 1967 borders. This follows talks in Amman this week between Meshaal King Abdullah of Jordan. Barel cites a Saudi newspaper, A-Sharq, which in turn cited “Jordanian sources.”

He said Meshaal had authorized Abdullah to pass the new Hamas position along to President Obama.

The report continues:

The meeting is also said to have covered Palestinian reconciliation and relations with Jordan. So far neither Hamas nor Jordan has officially verified the Saudi report, but Meshal’s public statement after the meeting, in which he said, “Jordan is Jordan, and Palestine is Palestine, and any talks about relations between a Palestinian state and Jordan will only be held after the establishment of a Palestinian state,” more than hint at an essential change in Hamas’ position.

To date, Hamas has rejected the two-state solution, although it welcomed the Arab peace initiative whose core was the existence of two states based on the 1967 borders. In the past, however, Meshal has stressed that the 1967 borders are only a first step in the ultimate liberation of all of Palestine. This change in position is an extension of a previous shift in orientation in which Hamas, after fierce opposition, decided to support Mahmoud Abbas’ effort to gain international acceptance of Palestine as a non-member observer nation in the United Nations.

No official confirmation from Jordan or Hamas, but Saeb Erekat, the Palestinian Authority’s chief negotiator with Israel, seems to take the report very seriously:

Saeb Erekat, the Palestinian official in charge of negotiations with Israel, responded to the report and said he is taking Meshal’s statement very seriously. He said he welcomed Hamas’ acceptance of the two-state solution, adding that “the change in position stems from the fact that Hamas understands that joining the PLO obligates it to act on the basis of the PLO’s political program, whose starting point is the two-state solution in the 1967 borders with East Jerusalem as its capital.”


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