Bintel Blog

Everyone’s a Critic (and a Therapist)

By Gabriel Sanders

On Tuesday, as part of its spin on the Tikkun Leil Shavuot — the all-night study session traditionally observed on Shavuot eve — the JCC in Manhattan screened a number of episodes of the hit Israeli television series “Bitipul,” or “In Treatment.” (The JCC defines “study” broadly.)

The series was presented by psychologists Jill Salberg and Shuki Cohen, who introduced the show and led some post-screening discussions. The effect of the series, each episode of which is devoted to a session between a therapist (played by actor Asi Dayan) and one his patients, has been nothing short of revolutionary, Salberg and Cohen said. It has led to an increase in the number of Israelis in therapy — and an increase in what Israeli therapists are charging. (HBO is reportedly developing its own version of the show.)

To get a sense of the audience’s familiarity with the Israeli scene — and its level of psychoanalytic savvy — the two doctors did some informal polling. “How many here are from Israel?” they asked. About half the audience raised their hands. “How many here have never been in therapy?” Again about half the audience. “How many here work in the field of behavioral health?” Yet again, about 50%. (This is the Upper West Side, after all.)

With their polling complete, Drs. Salberg and Cohen started speaking about the show’s premiere episode, but they didn’t get very far. A bearded fellow with what sounded like an Australian accent — quite possibly voicing the audience’s consensus opinion — couldn’t take any more: “Can we just get on with the show and save the discussion for later?” he said cantankerously. And that’s all it took. The two doctors quickly slinked off the stage and dimmed the lights.

As they left, the bearded fellow — possibly in an effort inoculate himself against being perceived as a crank — added, “I’m a therapist myself.”


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Bitipul, Television, Israeli Culture, Holidays, Therapy, Shavuot, JCC in Manhattan




Find us on Facebook!
  • Woody Allen on the situation in #Gaza: It's “a terrible, tragic thing. Innocent lives are lost left and right, and it’s a horrible situation that eventually has to right itself.”
  • "Mark your calendars: It was on Sunday, July 20, that the momentum turned against Israel." J.J. Goldberg's latest analysis on Israel's ground operation in Gaza:
  • What do you think?
  • "To everyone who is reading this article and saying, “Yes, but… Hamas,” I would ask you to just stop with the “buts.” Take a single moment and allow yourself to feel this tremendous loss. Lay down your arms and grieve for the children of Gaza."
  • Professor Dan Markel, 41 years old, was found shot and killed in his Tallahassee home on Friday. Jay Michaelson can't explain the death, just grieve for it.
  • Employees complained that the food they received to end the daily fast during the holy month of Ramadan was not enough (no non-kosher food is allowed in the plant). The next day, they were dismissed.
  • Why are peace activists getting beat up in Tel Aviv? http://jd.fo/s4YsG
  • Backstreet's...not back.
  • Before there was 'Homeland,' there was 'Prisoners of War.' And before there was Claire Danes, there was Adi Ezroni. Share this with 'Homeland' fans!
  • BREAKING: Was an Israeli soldier just kidnapped in Gaza? Hamas' military wing says yes.
  • What's a "telegenically dead" Palestinian?
  • 13 Israeli soldiers die in Gaza — the deadliest day for the IDF in decades. So much for 'precision' strikes and easy exit strategies.
  • What do a Southern staple like okra and an Israeli favorite like tahini have in common? New Orleans chef Alon Shaya brings sabra tastes to the Big Easy.
  • The Cossacks were a feature in every European Jewish kid's worst nightmare. Tuvia Tenenbom went looking for the real-life variety in Ukraine — but you won't believe what he found. http://forward.com/articles/202181/my-hunt-for-the-cossacks-in-ukraine/?
  • French Jews were stunned when an anti-Israel mob besieged a synagogue outside Paris. What happened next could be a historic turning point.
  • from-cache

Would you like to receive updates about new stories?




















We will not share your e-mail address or other personal information.

Already subscribed? Manage your subscription.