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The Haredim Are Right!: Topless DJ's Shouldn't Be Used To Sell Deodorant

By Daniel Treiman

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Ha’aretz reports:

A recent marketing campaign for Unilever’s Axe deodorant for men raised the hackles of the ultra-Orthodox community when the corporation sponsored a poolside party for teens, DJed by a topless Hungarian disc jockey flown in for the event, and attended by other partially-clad young women.

Unsurprisingly, despite Unilever’s written apology to the Haredi community, its leaders remain unsatisfied. Rabbi Gabriel Papenheim, who chairs the Kashrut Committee for Badatz, told TheMarker that the matter was initially to have ended with their apology, but Badatz is now demanding that an apology also be published in the secular press. “The insult was to the secular community no less than to us,” he said.

I’d like to note the hilarious home-page teaser that Ha’aretz ran for this article: “Deodorant maker apologizes for topless DJ, Haredim still angry”

UPDATE: Commenter Joel Katz of the Religion and State in Israel blog helpfully informs me that my original headline (“The Haredim Are Right!: Topless DJ’s Shouldn’t Be Used To Sell Deodorant to Teens”), which was based on the Ha’aretz article I cited, was misleading. He explains that the party was geared toward adults, and it appears from a video of the event (warning: there’s nudity) that he may be right.

Still, I stand by my larger point. Not to be too much of a prude, but I do think there’s something vulgar and a little exploitative about a big corporation putting on a party like this to push deodorant. (I’d be more tolerant if a similar event were put on in the name of bohemianism rather than crass commercialism.) I also think that Tikkun Olam blogger Richard Silverstein goes (characteristically) overboard in accusing the Haredim of behaving like the “Taliban” in this particular instance. (I actually thought that the rabbi’s insistence that the company should direct its apology not to the Haredim but to the secular community was kind of classy.) Silverstein would have been wiser to reserve the T-word for a different recent incident instead. Then again, it is also true that given the leaders of Israel’s Haredi community’s general proclivity for religious coercion, they’re not likely to be taken seriously even when they’re making a reasonable point.


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Comments
Joel Katz - Religion and State in Israel Tue. Jul 15, 2008

<p>Sorry to say, but you blew it with the headline for the posting.</p> <p>The story has a lot more behind it than sex, deoderant, and rock and roll.</p> <p>Check out Richard Silverstein's take on the issue at his Tikkun Olam blog: "Jewish Taliban Ax ‘Axe’ in Nude Niki-Tizzy".</p> <p>Jewish Taliban Ax ‘Axe’ in Nude Niki-Tizzy</p> <p>Warning: Video contains nudity.</p> <p>If you want to see the video of the actual Unilever-Axe party (which shows that it was private and for adults) go to:</p> <p>VIDEO</p> <p>Religion and State in Israel </p> <p>EDITOR'S NOTE: This comment was posted Friday, July 11</p>

Beth Sun. Jul 13, 2008

"Taliban" is the new Nazi! And once again, by using that epithet abusively, Silverstein both diminishes the crimes committed by the Taliban and makes the Haredim look inestimably worst than they actually are. All this does is distort things - a characteristic of Silverstein's typically over the top rants. The party thrown by Unilever was indeed tacky to the extreme, an affront to good taste no matter what one's religious orientation and a dumb move given that Unilever's largest market segment in Israel is Orthodox Jews. And I'm not a prude, or particularly religious. I have nothing against exposed boobs. But when I see tacky, I call it. And this was tacky to the extreme.




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