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Adlerstein vs. Angel on Conversion

By Daniel Treiman

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Last month, Rabbi Marc Angel, rabbi emeritus of New York’s historic Congregation Shearith Israel, penned an impassioned critique of the adoption of new — and, he argued, needlessly restrictive — conversion policies by the Rabbinical Council of America, an organization he once served as its president.

The article generated plenty of discussion in the Orthodox world (including a response from several other past presidents of the RCA in a letter to the Forward). While the RCA is the main body for Centrist and Modern Orthdox rabbis, Angel’s article has also generated discussion in more religiously right-leaning precincts.

Indeed, the debate has now migrated from the pages of the Forward to a new venue: the blog Cross-Currents, a lively forum on Jewish issues whose contributors include a number of prominent Haredi thinkers. One Cross-Currents blogger, Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein of Los Angeles, penned a lengthy reply to Angel’s Forward article. Now, Angel has responded on Cross-Currents, and Adlerstein has weighed in again.

The debate is a bit esoteric for the general reader, but its contours are nevertheless quite interesting.

While I’m definitely no halachic expert (I’m actually a halachic ignoramus), I’ll nevertheless toss in my two cents:

I was struck by how Rabbi Adlerstein began his original post. He wrote:

Most issues raised by Rabbi Marc Angel’s recent essay on conversion standards are not going to change the quality of your life, unless you are a candidate for conversion. One issue does, and it deserves the attention of all committed Jews.

In Rabbi Adlerstein’s view, it seems, the issue that, broadly speaking, matters is not so much the dispute over the conversion process, but rather Rabbi Angel’s interpretation of the halachic process, the process by which Jewish law is discerned.

Now, as I stated before, I’m in no way qualified to weigh in on these halachic issues. But I do think that one of the problems when it comes to the issue of conversion is reflected in the way Rabbi Adlerstein begins his essay, and the relative unimportance he seems to ascribe to the issue of conversion (at least compared to the great importance he places on issues of halachic process).

The fact is that the Jewish community has a crisis on its hands: Without consensus on the definitional matter of “Who is a Jew,” we will no longer be one people. In Israel, there are hundreds of thousands of immigrants from the former Soviet Union, who — although many may identify as Jews, and have Jewish ancestry — are not recognized as Jews by the Orthodox establishment, and for that reason cannot even marry Jews in Israel. Many, however, would be open to converting, and a Joint Conversion Institute has been established, with cooperation of Orthodox rabbis, to enable them to become Jews through a legitimate conversion process. The official Orthodox rabbinic courts, however, rather than helping repair this fissure in Jewish peoplehood, have been obstructionist. (See this Haaretz article for more on this.) Here in the United States, many with Jewish fathers, who would like to be recognized as full-fledged Jews, face similar challenges.

A recognized path to Orthodox conversion that maintains its halachic integrity while still allowing for a degree of flexibility would be a great help in addressing this issue. Is such a thing possible under Jewish law? I’ll leave that question to the rabbis. I will, however, say that this is an issue that affects not just potential converts, but anyone who cares about the Jewish people — and “deserves the attention of all committed Jews.” I also believe that when Orthodox rabbis recognize that this is a problem that urgently needs to be addressed, we are more likely to see halachic interpretations and religious practices that are helpful rather than obstructionist.

Instead, too many Orthodox rabbis have privileged their commitment to a very restrictive interpretation of halacha over the practical needs of the Jewish people, letting the principle of klal yisrael fall victim to ideology. I should add, however, that the Orthodox have no monopoly on this type of behavior. Indeed, this tendency has a mirror-image in Reform Judaism, which has also created a great definitional rupture in Jewish peoplehood. Privileging its commitment to religious liberalism over and above Jewish unity, the Reform movement unilaterally recognized patrilineal descent as a basis for Jewishness and began a policy of active outreach to non-Jewish religious seekers.

In taking these actions, the Reform movement not only parted ways with the Orthodox, but also with Conservative Jews. It’s one thing for Jews to differ on worship; it’s another to split on the very basis of Jewish identity. Rather than risk a unbridgeable schism, we would all do better to seek consensus and cooperation on these very fundamental questions. That, however, requires a pragmatic willingness to privilege Jewish unity over the sectarian comforts of ideological purism.


Permalink | | Share | Email | Print | Filed under: Conversion, Marc Angel, RCA, Yitzchok Adlerstein

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Comments
Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Thu. Dec 20, 2007

Guilty as charged! Daniel senses that halachic process looms exceedingly large in my mind, and he is correct. I pray that the love of halacha – that which makes traditional Jews traditional Jews – should grow within myself and my children forever. The belief that halacha is a G-d given roadmap to spiritual accomplishment has well served the Jewish people in the past. With intermarriage rates what they are, and Jewish population replenishment at less than ZPG, it certainly looks like the most important guarantor of a Jewish future is also linked to those who pledge fealty to halachic expectation. Nowhere, however, did I or would I imply that the conversion issue is unimportant. Daniel is quite right that Israel is sitting on a tinderbox of a social problem in regard to non-Jews in their midst, who are neither here nor there. We should remember, though, that the problem was created not by halacha. To the contrary, halachists protested throughout the years that the Jewish Agency recruited everyone in Russian in whom they could find a single Jewish blood cell, despite warnings that they would be creating a bifurcated populace. It is reasonable to expect people committed to halacha to use every ounce of sensitivity in dealing with the human issue. I am a member of a standing court for conversion in Los Angeles, and am proud of our treatment of each candidate as a unique person, and as a unique potential gift to the Jewish people. It is unreasonable, however, to expect halacha to bend past the breaking point to clean up the mess created by those who are contemptuous of halacha. Daniel is right again when he sees the need for consensus in approach to conversion. This is precisely where we have to part company with Rabbi Angel. Rabbi Uziel’s approach could never serve as the basis of a consensus, because the overwhelming majority of those conversant with serious halachic discourse – both in the centrist and haredi parts of the Orthodox world – reject it. And as I wrote in my piece, if his key assumption – that converts not ready to live a halachic life-style ultimately would come around and see the light – ever had merit, time has shown that this is not the case today. I am afraid that Rabbi Angel, rather than looking to the future as a visionary, is hopelessly mired in the past. The Talmud states that converts are “difficult for Israel like a scab.” Two chief understandings of this passage emerged in time. One saw the difficulty in converts joining up with the baggage that the rest of the community didn’t need. The other saw difficulty in their stellar devotion making everyone else look bad by comparison. The difference, of course, is in the individual convert. Herod, not one of our better rulers, was part of another scheme to integrate marginal people into the main body. Converting the Idumeans (also by halachically spurious means) was a drastic failure. Halacha has done a good job extending a helping hand to those who should join our people, and helping others make the right choice in turning down membership. It is still our best bet for the future.

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein Fri. Dec 21, 2007

Guilty as charged! Daniel senses that halachic process looms exceedingly large in my mind, and he is correct. I pray that the love of halacha – that which makes traditional Jews traditional Jews – should grow within myself and my children forever. The belief that halacha is a G-d given roadmap to spiritual accomplishment has well served the Jewish people in the past. With intermarriage rates what they are, and Jewish population replenishment at less than ZPG, it certainly looks like the most important guarantor of a Jewish future is also linked to those who pledge fealty to halachic expectation. Nowhere, however, did I or would I imply that the conversion issue is unimportant. Daniel is quite right that Israel is sitting on a tinderbox of a social problem in regard to non-Jews in their midst, who are neither here nor there. We should remember, though, that the problem was created not by halacha. To the contrary, halachists protested throughout the years that the Jewish Agency recruited everyone in Russian in whom they could find a single Jewish blood cell, despite warnings that they would be creating a bifurcated populace. It is reasonable to expect people committed to halacha to use every ounce of sensitivity in dealing with the human issue. I am a member of a standing court for conversion in Los Angeles, and am proud of our treatment of each candidate as a unique person, and as a unique potential gift to the Jewish people. It is unreasonable, however, to expect halacha to bend past the breaking point to clean up the mess created by those who are contemptuous of halacha. Daniel is right again when he sees the need for consensus in approach to conversion. This is precisely where we have to part company with Rabbi Angel. Rabbi Uziel’s approach could never serve as the basis of a consensus, because the overwhelming majority of those conversant with serious halachic discourse – both in the centrist and haredi parts of the Orthodox world – reject it. And as I wrote in my piece, if his key assumption – that converts not ready to live a halachic life-style ultimately would come around and see the light – ever had merit, time has shown that this is not the case today. I am afraid that Rabbi Angel, rather than looking to the future as a visionary, is hopelessly mired in the past. The Talmud states that converts are “difficult for Israel like a scab.” Two chief understandings of this passage emerged in time. One saw the difficulty in converts joining up with the baggage that the rest of the community didn’t need. The other saw difficulty in their stellar devotion making everyone else look bad by comparison. The difference, of course, is in the individual convert. Herod, not one of our better rulers, was part of another scheme to integrate marginal people into the main body. Converting the Idumeans (also by halachically spurious means) was a drastic failure. Halacha has done a good job extending a helping hand to those who should join our people, and helping others make the right choice in turning down membership. It is still our best bet for the future.

yale harlow Thu. Dec 20, 2007

You are way off base referring to Rabbi Adlerstein as "Haredi." He supports Israel and is often sought by the L.A. Times for his view on Orthodox matters and on Israel. He is a professor at Loyola University in Los Angeles and engages in discussions with religious persons of all faiths. I do not know what your definition of Haredi is, but I'm sure that if you researched 'Rabbi Adlerstin's background and philosophy, you would not refer to him as being Heredi.

rabbi marc d. angel Tue. Dec 18, 2007

I agree with Daniel Treiman's analysis of the importance of this issue to the Jewish people, and was also disappointed in R. Adlerstein's approach. There is ample room in halakha to take a more inclusive and compassionate approach, and that is what I am arguing for. Regrettably, the views espoused by R. Adlerstein have become "normative" in the contemporary Orthodox rabbinic establishment. I hope that readers will see my book "Choosing to Be Jewish: The Orthodox Road to Conversion", for an Orthodox approach that is properly grounded in halakha, while at the same time responsive to the genuine needs of the Jewish people and those who would join us sincerely.

matti powojski Tue. Dec 16, 2008

abc

PiterKokoniz Wed. Apr 8, 2009

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